September 12, 2018 5:21 pm

RCMP hold Move Over event in memory of fallen Nova Scotia Mountie

WATCH: Nova Scotia RCMP held a Move Over event on Wednesday to mark exactly one year since a fellow Mountie died in the line of duty. Callum Smith has more.

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Nova Scotia RCMP held a Move Over event on Wednesday to mark exactly one year since a fellow Mountie died in the line of duty.

Const. Frank Deschênes was a 12-year veteran of the RCMP. He was killed on Sept. 12, 2017, when he stopped to help motorists change a tire on the side of a highway in Memramcook, N.B.

A utility van eventually collided with his police car and the SUV.

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Deschênes was pronounced dead at the scene, while the two people in the SUV were taken to hospital and released. The driver of the van was also treated in hospital but later taken into police custody.

Vasiliy Meshko of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., later pleaded guilty to driving without care and attention. In December, he was fined $3,000, received two years’ probation and was banned from driving in New Brunswick for two years.

READ MORE: Widow of Nova Scotia Mountie killed on N.B. highway wants move-over law broadened

Nova Scotia RCMP officers held information checkpoints across the province on Wednesday, passing out information to motorists to ensure they understand their responsibilities under the province’s Move Over law.

“(Wednesday) was a little bit more emotional for sure, putting on uniform today know what we were doing,” says Const. Bryce Haight of the RCMP.

RCMP pulled motorists over to inform and educate them about the Move Over law in Amherst, N.S., on Sept. 12.

Callum Smith/Global News
RCMP say there’s been some improvements with people moving over, but the speeds in the far lane are still being clocked at over 100 km/h.
“There are still a lot of people that go by fast enough and close enough to our vehicles to rock them,” says Cpl. David McLean of the RCMP.

A recent amendment, known as Frankie’s Law, included tow trucks in the list of vehicles that, when their lights are flashing, require drivers to move to the left and slow to 60 km/h.

Deschênes’ death had prompted calls for the law to be expanded in Nova Scotia as well as New Brunswick.

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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