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Calgary’s ovarian cancer walk aims to battle the ‘most fatal’ female disease

The walk raised money and awareness for what Ovarian Cancer Canada calls the "most fatal" women's cancer through the organization's Walk of Hope. Global News

More than 500 people laced up their sneakers and pounded the trails in Glenmore Park on Sunday.

Their efforts raised money and awareness for what Ovarian Cancer Canada calls the “most fatal” women’s cancer through the organization’s Walk of Hope.

According to Ovarian Cancer Canada, one out of every two women diagnosed with ovarian cancer isn’t expected to live another five years and survival rates haven’t seen much improvement in the past half century.

“The survival rate is the lowest of all women’s cancers. There’s currently no diagnostic test for ovarian cancer,” said Erin Walker, the chair of Calgary’s Ovarian Cancer Walk of Hope. “In addition, it’s hard to diagnose and a lot of women ignore issues and symptoms so it’s really important that we get the message out there and get more research.”

“We really need to be advocates for ourselves and talk to our doctors when we’re not feeling well and push for tests.”

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The walk raised money and awareness for what Ovarian Cancer Canada calls the “most fatal” women’s cancer through the organization’s Walk of Hope. Global News

Since its inception in 2002, the walk has raised more than $25 million for cancer support and research. As of Sunday afternoon, Calgary has raised almost $144,000 of its $150,000 goal.

Calgary’s five-kilometre walk was one of 35 across the country this weekend that aim to bring communities together.

“Today’s not just about raising money,” Walker said. “It’s partly about the community, bringing together, bringing awareness and supporting women and families who have gone through this disease.”

The walk raised money and awareness for what Ovarian Cancer Canada calls the “most fatal” women’s cancer through the organization’s Walk of Hope. Global News

Money raised goes toward education and research, something that’s at the core of Ovarian Cancer Canada.

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“We’re around 365 [days] to support people and give them education and information,” Walker said.

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