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Maple syrup producers in N.B. hope Mother Nature provides proper ingredients for a banner year

Click to play video: 'Maple syrup producers in N.B. hope Mother Nature provides proper ingredients for a banner year' Maple syrup producers in N.B. hope Mother Nature provides proper ingredients for a banner year
WATCH: New Brunswick is the third largest maple syrup producer in North America and the producer behind the multi-million dollar industry say they hope an early start will make for a good year. Morganne Campbell has more – Mar 2, 2018

Weather conditions are “looking good” for an ideal season for New Brunswick’s lucrative, multi-million dollar maple syrup industry, producers say.

New Brunswick is actually the third largest maple syrup producer in North America, following behind Quebec and Vermont, producing more than three million kilograms of maple syrup per year.

That generated revenue of over $33 million in 2017, with the province’s maple syrup exported to over 35 countries.

“Prices are basically around $3.00 a pound, so when you have a lot of trees and a lot of syrup made, it can translate into millions of dollars for the industry here in the province,” explained David Briggs, the president of the North American Maple Syrup Council.

READ MORE: Everything you ever wanted to know about maple syrup

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The maple syrup season is about to get into full swing across the province. And with warm days and cools nights, it’s the perfect recipe for syrup-making weather.

“There’s hardly any snow. It’s really good going. You don’t need snow shoes, so it’s looking good,” explained Darrell Trites, a third generation producer just outside Moncton.

“It’s something like the people that run the sawmills. They have sawdust in their blood, we have maple syrup in our blood.”

Some producers are already boiling sap.

“Boiled three times already,” said Dale Renton, while tapping trees and setting up the sugar shack that’s been in his family since the 1800s. “Three times in February is unusual.”

READ MORE: Spring-like thaw keeps maple producers in Peterborough area busy

It’s an industry that relies solely on Mother Nature, and she is a wild card.

“She’s got all of the cards,” Trites said.

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