Advertisement

Montreal seeks citizen input on animal control after revoking pit bull ban

Click to play video 'Montreal seeks citizen input on animal control after revoking pit bull ban' Montreal seeks citizen input on animal control after revoking pit bull ban
Public consultations to amend the city of Montreal's animal control by-law have begun. Mayor Valerie Plante has promised to repeal and replace the current ban on pit-bulls. As Global's Dan Spector reports, the process comes just days after a pit bull owner was convicted of criminal negligence after his dog severely mauled a 7 year-old girl.

The City of Montreal is asking citizens to weigh in on a new animal control bylaw after suspending the previous administration’s controversial pit bull ban.

The city is holding a series of consultations – the first of which was Saturday – and has created a website and an online survey to seek public input.

“We’re doing round tables trying to flesh out some of the dominant ideas, things Montrealers might want in priority and some of the best ideas to reduce the amount of bites and raise security for Montrealers,” said city councilor Craig Sauvé, who is moderating the discussions.

READ MORE: Montreal moves to reform controversial pit bull-type breed ban

Sauvé says that a central theme of the discussions thus far has been the need for more education for dog
owners and families.

Story continues below advertisement

“People told me they want to see owners are prepared to have animals, that they’re going to be good owners and that they know how to be an owner,” Sauvé said.

The councilor says the city wants to draft a new bylaw that will focus on reducing dog bites without targeting any specific breed.

“There’s no proof that pit bulls are more aggressive that other dogs. All dogs can bite, all dogs can be potentially dangerous,” he said in an interview.

READ MORE: Man convicted in Longueuil dog attack that injured girl

Montreal Mayor Valerie Plante’s administration suspended the pit bull ban in December, calling it unscientific.

Sauvé says the city plans to have a new bylaw in place by summer.