Advertisement

60,000 North Korean children could face starvation, says UNICEF

In this photo taken on Sunday, April 8, 2012, a North Korean man pulls an ox drawn cart near North Korean residents working in a field on the outskirts of Pyongyang, North Korea.
In this photo taken on Sunday, April 8, 2012, a North Korean man pulls an ox drawn cart near North Korean residents working in a field on the outskirts of Pyongyang, North Korea. AP Photo/Ng Han Guan

GENEVA, Jan 30 (Reuters) – An estimated 60,000 children face potential starvation in North Korea, where international sanctions are exacerbating the situation by slowing aid deliveries, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said on Tuesday.

World powers have imposed growing sanctions on North Korea for its nuclear and ballistic missile programs. Last week the United States announced fresh sanctions on nine entities, 16 people and six North Korean ships it accused of helping the weapons programs.

Under United Nations Security Council resolutions, humanitarian supplies or operations are exempt from sanctions, Omar Abdi, UNICEF deputy executive director, said.

READ MORE: What happens to North Korea’s aid money

“But what happens is that of course the banks, the companies that provide goods or ship goods are very careful. They don’t want to take any risk of later on being associated (with) breaking the sanctions,” Abdi told a news briefing.

Story continues below advertisement

“That is what makes it more difficult for us to bring things. So it takes a little bit longer, especially in getting money into the country. But also in shipping goods to DPRK. There are not many shipping lines that operate in that area,” he said, referring to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea.

Sanctions on fuel have been tightened, making it more scarce and expensive, Abdi added.

Reuters, citing three Western European intelligence sources, reported exclusively last week that North Korea shipped coal to Russia last year which was then delivered to South Korea and Japan in a likely violation of U.N. sanctions.

READ MORE: UN committee condemns North Korea for building missiles as people starve

“We are projecting that at some point during the year 60,000 children will become severely malnourished. This is the malnutrition that potentially can lead to death. It’s protein and calorie malnutrition,” said Manuel Fontaine, director of UNICEF emergency programs worldwide.

“So the trend is worrying, it’s not getting any better.”

In all, 200,000 North Korean children suffer from acute malnutrition, including 60,000 with the most severe form that can be lethal, according to UNICEF.

UNICEF had projected 60,000 children would suffer severe acute malnutrition last year, and reached 39,000 of them with therapeutic feeding, spokesman Christophe Boulierac said.

Story continues below advertisement

“Diarrhea related to poor sanitation and hygiene and acute malnutrition remains a leading cause of death among young children,” it said in Tuesday’s appeal to donors that gave no toll.

WATCH: U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the United States is receiving evidence that international sanctions are “really starting to hurt” North Korea.

Click to play video 'Tillerson: Evidence sanctions ‘really starting to hurt’ North Korea' Tillerson: Evidence sanctions ‘really starting to hurt’ North Korea
Tillerson: Evidence sanctions ‘really starting to hurt’ North Korea

UNICEF is seeking $16.5 million this year to provide nutrition, health and water to North Koreans but faces “operational challenges” due to the tense political context and “unintended consequences” of sanctions, it said.

READ MORE: Is North Korea starving and killing its own people? Here’s the evidence

It cited “disruptions to banking channels, delays in clearing relief items at entry ports, difficulty securing suppliers and a 160 percent increase in fuel prices.”

Story continues below advertisement

“It’s a very close, and tightly monitored intervention which is purely humanitarian in its essence,” Fontaine said.

UNICEF is one of only a few aid agencies with access to the isolated country, which suffered famine in the mid-1990s that killed up to three million people.

(Reporting by Stephanie Nebehay; Editing by Peter Graff)