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Mary Walsh on Hollywood sexual harassment and being a woman in comedy

Mary Walsh uncensored take on Harvey Weinstein and sexual misconduct in media industry
WATCH: Mary Walsh gives her uncensored take on Harvey Weinstein and sexual misconduct in media industry

NOTE: These videos contain foul language. Please watch at your own discretion.

Canadian comedian Mary Walsh has a unique perspective: not only has she been in the world of comedy for a long time, but as a woman, she’s faced infinitely more obstacles than her male counterparts. She’s seen it all — perhaps too much?

Walsh said that she’s never been sexually harassed or assaulted on the job, but as a woman, in her regular life, “of course” she’s experienced it.

WATCH BELOW: Mary Walsh on what it’s like being a woman in comedy

Mary Walsh on what it’s like being a woman in the media industry
Mary Walsh on what it’s like being a woman in the media industry

Walsh also spoke with Global News about the belief that sometimes pops up in conversation — that women aren’t really funny. She definitely had some choice words on that, which you can hear in the video, above.

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Given the sensitive environment, we also asked her if it’s still appropriate to tell sex jokes. Whose opinion carries more weight than someone like Walsh, who doesn’t deviate or shy away from even the most contentious of topics? (After all, this is the woman who bravely confronted late Toronto mayor Rob Ford in his own driveway for 22 Minutes.)

WATCH BELOW: Mary Walsh on sex jokes

Mary Walsh on whether we should tell sex jokes
Mary Walsh on whether we should tell sex jokes

Walsh concludes that while sex jokes are still OK to tell (sensitively, of course), it’s a watershed moment in society, when all people, regardless of gender or class, need to start considering others’ feelings before telling any joke. That’s not to say censorship is required, but rather an understanding of struggles from person to person is necessary. In other words, she said, humans need to practice common decency.

“I don’t think sex jokes are over,” she said. “There’s something profoundly funny about sex … but I think people might want to be a little more … thoughtful about what they’re saying.”

READ MORE: Jimmy Fallon ratings plummet, Stephen Colbert reigning king of late night

Walsh, 65, is back on TV with her beloved troupe of characters from 2006 comedy Hatching, Matching and Dispatching, this time for the holidays in A Christmas Fury. The Newfoundland-shot movie starts with Walsh’s character (matriarch Mamie Lou) trying to make a big life change, but her plans are derailed by the arrival of a foster child, who puts the chaos back in Christmas. What could possibly go wrong? Well, everything, as it turns out.

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The actor found shooting the movie to be a nice reprieve from all the Hollywood seriousness going on at the moment, and she said it felt like coming home. That makes sense, considering she was born in St. John’s.

“I hate Christmas, but it’s such a nice Christmas movie!” laughed Walsh.

‘A Christmas Fury’ airs on CBC on Sunday, Dec. 3 at 8 p.m. ET/PT.