November 7, 2017 9:57 am
Updated: November 7, 2017 2:00 pm

Bancroft ‘yarn bombers’ knit tribute to Canada’s soldiers

A group of knitters in Bancroft, Ont., has found a unique way to pay tribute to those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

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A group of knitters and crocheters from Bancroft, Ont., “yarn bombed,” the Const. Thomas Kehoe Memorial Bridge Sunday, affixing around 2,000 knitted poppies to the structure.

“Yarn bombing” is a type of street art that uses colourful crocheted or knit yarn.

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“With everything that’s happening globally, and even in a small community like Bancroft, we wanted to find a way to help people to reflect on peace, on community, and on the sacrifices that have been made,” Hospice Bancroft’s Barb Shaw said.

The knitters — who are members of the group Knittervention — meet at the hospice’s thrift store in downtown Bancroft each Thursday.

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“It’s about 2,000 poppies in total,” said knitter Mel Dureault.

The group has been working on the project to mark Remembrance Day for about five months, using donated yarn.

Dawn Grinsteed said the effort wasn’t just about paying tribute — it was about educating younger generations.

“Remembering,” she said. “Not forgetting our soldiers, and why we have Remembrance Day. And more education for the next generations, and the next generations.”

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Most of the poppies went up Sunday night.

On Monday morning, residents could be seen taking pictures of the work as they crossed the bridge. Motorists honked at the knitters as they affixed the last few poppies to the bridge.

“It’s really heart warming, to be honest,” one Bancroft resident said, “and it’s really touching to walk across the bridge, to see everything here.”

The poppies will stay on the bridge until Remembrance Day on Saturday.

© 2017 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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