August 21, 2017 5:59 pm

United Conservative Party’s Brian Jean pushes energy literacy in schools

Brian Jean speaks in Medicine Hat, Alta. on Aug. 15, 2017.

COURTESY: CHAT News
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A former Opposition leader who wants to run Alberta’s new United Conservative Party says he wants kids to learn more about the energy industry in school, including the effects of climate change.

Brian Jean says he wants more information in classrooms about products made by the energy industry and what impact it has on the provincial and national economies.

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“For instance, many people don’t understand what’s made of petroleum, what are petroleum products,” Jean said Monday as he rolled out his education platform in Calgary.

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“When people have a basic understanding of that kind of thing, I think it makes them understand how important it is to the world, in particular how important Alberta is to the world.”

Jean said that should include the effect of fossil fuels on the environment through climate change.

“They (students) need to have all the facts in front of them to make the proper decisions in the future.”

Jean was leader of the Wildrose party, which merged last month with the Progressive Conservatives to create the United Conservative Party.

READ MORE: UCP leadership candidate Brian Jean reveals platform

Watch below: On July 25, 2017, David Boushy filed this report after United Conservative Party leadership candidate Brain Jean announced his economic platform in Calgary.

A leader is to be picked in October and four candidates are in the running.

Jean says he’s skeptical of a curriculum review currently being undertaken by the province.

He said it’s critical to get back to basics in the classroom, particularly when it comes to math and language skills.

Jean said he wants to see more course work on historical and financial literacy. He would also restore provincial achievement tests in Grade 3 and retain them in grades 6 and 9.

“Focusing on these elements will lead our province’s education system back to the top,” he said.

© 2017 The Canadian Press

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