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Life is Worth Living: sisters reducing the stigma surrounding suicide

Click to play video: 'Life is Worth Living: sisters reducing the stigma surrounding suicide' Life is Worth Living: sisters reducing the stigma surrounding suicide
WATCH ABOVE: The Kennedy sisters are shedding light on the stigma surrounding mental health, one T-shirt at a time – Jun 28, 2017

The Kennedy sisters don’t ever want to see another family go through the tragedy they experienced.

In 2004, at the age of 19, their older sister Brianne Kennedy took her own life.

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“Brianne was our beautiful older sister. We always looked up to her,” Jacklyn Kennedy said. “She was intelligent, talented, and she really could have done anything in her life.”

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Brianne left behind three younger sisters: Jaclyn, Callie and Shalyn. The Kindersley, Sask., natives have launched an awareness campaign and clothing line called Life is Worth Living BCK to help reduce the stigma surrounding mental illness and suicide.

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They have shared their story in schools across Saskatchewan.

“Talking about it has helped heal us … and helped with our grieving after losing Brianne,” Jaclyn said.

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Callie adds that it’s important to “be able to keep her memory alive and to share with other people that mental illness can affect anyone.”

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“If you look at my sister in lots of her pictures, even the week leading up to her death, you wouldn’t see a girl who is feeling so much pain inside that she doesn’t think her life is worth living anymore.”

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This is a picture of the four sisters few weeks before Brianne took her own life. Instagram / @lifeisworthlivingbck
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Brianne Kennedy was just 19 years old when she took her life in 2004. Instagram / @lifeisworthlivingbck

All proceeds from T-shirts and sweaters sold go to the Canadian Mental Health Association (CMHA). The sisters have already donated $1,500 to CMHA in memory of Brianne, and hope to make another donation soon.

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READ MORE: Major depression is on the rise in youth, especially teenage girls

“It’s something that we need to talk about and bring to the surface and get rid of this stigma,” Callie added.

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