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Census 2016: Canada’s aging neighbourhoods, in 10 maps

For the first time, Canadian seniors outnumber children. .
For the first time, Canadian seniors outnumber children. .

Canada’s baby boomers have been pushing a demographic wave since the 1950s — filling schools, then universities, then workplaces.

Now, census data shows, they are swelling the numbers of Canadians over 65 — for the first time, there are more senior citizens in Canada than children.

Across Canada, neighbourhoods that skew older tend to be suburbs that are well-established, but not new. High-income neighbourhoods are often older, and areas around universities are younger.

Younger neighbourhoods are in downtown cores, but also new suburban areas farther away from city centres.

Canada has seven census tracts with an average age over 65:

  • Three are in British Columbia: two in Chilliwack, and one south of Aldergrove, right on the U.S. border.
  • Two are in Ontario: one in the Agincourt area of Scarborough, and the other on the shore of Lake Ontario in Darlington, east of Toronto.
  • The other two are in Regina and Lethbridge, Alta.
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Want to see age mapping for Canadian cities we haven’t focused on? Zoom out in any map and move around the country.

Toronto

Average age

Change in average age, 2011-16

READ: Baby boomers push retiree growth rate to highest in 70 years

Winnipeg

Average age

Change in average age, 2011-16

READ: The 2016 census shows the east coast is Canada’s rapidly greying region

Calgary

Average age

Change in average age, 2011-16

READ: Census 2016: For the 1st time, more seniors than children living in Canada

Edmonton

Average age

Change in average age, 2011-16

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READ: Census 2016: For the 1st time, more seniors than children living in Canada

Vancouver

Average age

Change in average age, 2011-16