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Stephen Colbert ‘burned my computer’ after Congress OK’s selling internet browsing data

Colbert on internet privacy ruling: ‘This is what’s wrong with Washington’
WATCH: Stephen Colbert on internet privacy ruling: 'This is what's wrong with Washington.'

During last night’s edition of The Late Show, host Stephen Colbert took aim at the U.S. Congressional vote to repeal internet privacy rules which would allow internet providers to sell private user browsing data without their consent.

Following the vote to allow internet service providers to share customers’ personal information, Colbert asked his audience, “Anybody here use the internet?”

“Might want to knock that off. Congress has now voted to allow internet providers to sell your web browsing history,” he warned.

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“I’ve got nothing to hide,” Colbert quipped. ” I burned my computer this morning.”

“This is what’s wrong with Washington, D.C.,” he continued. “I guarantee you there’s not one person — not one voter of any political stripe anywhere in America, who asked for this. No one in America stood up in a town hall and said, ‘Sir, I demand you let somebody else make money off my shameful desires. Maybe blackmail me someday!’”

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He rolled a clip of U.S. Republican representative Marsha Blackburn and joked at her insistence that this decision will actually enhance consumer privacy. “I know what’s in her search history. How to spout bullsh*t.”

Colbert also imagined what the U.S. House Republicans have been searching for online during Wednesday’s intro.  Some of the search terms included “what is the internet,” “bargain pleated khakis,” and “can you eat coal?”

The host also criticized part of the resolution that wouldn’t require internet providers to protect “customer information against hackers and thieves,” comparing it to a hotel that warns guests, “We don’t lock the doors.”

Watch the clip in the video above.

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