Advertisement

Appeal of ruling on law grads from Trinity Western begins in Halifax

Two men walk past the entrance to Trinity Western University, in Langley, B.C., on August 24, 2015.
Two men walk past the entrance to Trinity Western University, in Langley, B.C., on August 24, 2015. The Canadian Press

A hearing is now underway in Nova Scotia’s Court of Appeal for the provincial law society’s appeal of a ruling saying it doesn’t have the authority to deny accreditation to graduates of a Christian university.

The Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society decided in April 2014 to impose a ban on articling students from Trinity Western University in Langley, B.C.

READ MORE: Nova Scotia law society ordered to pay $70K to Trinity Western University

The university requires students to sign a community covenant that bans all sexual intimacy outside so-called “traditional” marriages between men and women.

The society argued that the agreement represents unlawful discrimination against gays and lesbians under the charter, and violates the province’s Human Rights Act.

The university argued that the society overstepped its jurisdiction and did not have the right to refuse a student because of the school’s conduct.

Story continues below advertisement

READ MORE: B.C. Christian university seeks review of Ontario law society ban of its graduates

In a January 2015 ruling, the province’s Supreme Court said the barristers’ society doesn’t have the power to require law schools to change their policies even if they may be offensive to many.