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New photos show aerial view of Air Canada flight 624 crash site

Air Canada
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP

HALIFAX – New photos released Wednesday show how close Air Canada flight 624 came to disaster.

The RCMP released the photos, taken from a police drone, as investigators continue to probe why the flight crashed as it was trying to land during a snowstorm in Halifax on Sunday.

READ MORE: Timeline of Air Canada flight 624 crash

The images offer a better view of the debris field around the plane, including where the engine from under its starboard wing came to rest after detaching.

The photos also show the extensive damage done to a nearby antenna array when the plane came in too low and struck it, losing its landing gear in the process.

An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows debris near the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows debris near the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows debris near the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows debris near the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP
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An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows debris near the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows debris near the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows debris near the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo provided by the RCMP shows debris near the crash site of Air Canada flight 624 at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. RCMP

The wreckage of the Airbus A320 aircraft was removed from the airport’s runway overnight on Tuesday.

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Officials said the runway will be inspected to determine if the landing strip needs any work before being reopened to air traffic.

READ MORE: Landing an aircraft in bad weather depends on many variables

WATCH: Passenger from flight AC624 captures the moments after they were evacuated from the plane and stuck on the runway

On Tuesday, the Transportation Safety Board said it had finished its examination of the site where the plane slammed into the ground and then skidded down the runway.

The board said it will maintain possession of the aircraft for further examination as it investigates what happened.

An investigator inspects Air Canada flight AC624 that crashed early Sunday morning during a snowstorm, at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax on Sunday, March 29, 2015.
An investigator inspects Air Canada flight AC624 that crashed early Sunday morning during a snowstorm, at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax on Sunday, March 29, 2015. Andrew Vaughan/The Canadian Press
The wreckage of Air Canada Flight 624 has been taken off the tarmac at Halifax Stanfield International Airport.
The wreckage of Air Canada Flight 624 has been taken off the tarmac at Halifax Stanfield International Airport. Andrew Vaughan / The Canadian Press
An aerial photo of the Air Canada crash at Halifax's Stanfield International Airport.
An aerial photo of the Air Canada crash at Halifax's Stanfield International Airport. (Vision Air Services Inc.)
Investigators stand near Air Canada flight AC624 that crashed early Sunday morning during a snowstorm, at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax on Sunday, March 29, 2015. Though there were injuries, everyone survived.
Investigators stand near Air Canada flight AC624 that crashed early Sunday morning during a snowstorm, at Stanfield International Airport in Halifax on Sunday, March 29, 2015. Though there were injuries, everyone survived. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
crash landings among Air Canada flights are rare – the airline is considered one of the safest in the world and hasn’t had a fatal crash in over 20 years.
An Air Canada plane is shown after skidding off a runway as it landed early Sunday, March 29, 2015 in a snowstorm in Halifax, an airport official said, sending 23 people to hospital after passengers described the jet sliding on its belly before it came to a stop. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Transportation Safety Board Canada
An Air Canada flight that ran off the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport early on Sunday.
An Air Canada flight that ran off the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport early on Sunday. Transportation Safety Board of Canada
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Extensive damage can be see to an Air Canada flight that ran off the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport early on Sunday.
Extensive damage can be see to an Air Canada flight that ran off the runway at Halifax Stanfield International Airport early on Sunday. Transportation Safety Board of Canada
Fire trucks and an airport shuttle are on the scene at the Halifax International Airport early Sunday March 29, 2015 after an Air Canada flight from Toronto made an abrupt landing and left the runway in bad weather.
Fire trucks and an airport shuttle are on the scene at the Halifax International Airport early Sunday March 29, 2015 after an Air Canada flight from Toronto made an abrupt landing and left the runway in bad weather. AP Photo/Mike Magnus

The plane was coming into Halifax from Toronto when it touched down 335 metres short of the runway and skidded on its belly for another 335 metres before coming to a stop.

There were 133 passengers and five crew members aboard, and 25 were taken to hospital with injuries.

-With files from Global News and The Canadian Press