Advertisement

Delta Police officer charged with second-degree murder

Cst. Jordan MacWilliams was charged this morning in the death of Mehrdad Bayami outside the Starlight Casino on Nov. 8, 2012. Shane MacKichan

A second-degree murder charge has been approved against a Delta police officer.

Cst. Jordan MacWilliams was charged this morning in the death of Mehrdad Bayami outside the Starlight Casino on Nov. 8, 2012.

Police were called to the casino’s parking lot early that morning after reports of a man with a gun.

The charge comes after an investigation by the Independent Investigations Office.

Delta Police said Monday that their thoughts are with the Bayami family, but the force won’t be making any further comment on the shooting.

“I respect and understand the roles of Crown Counsel and the Independent Investigations Office. This incident occurred almost two years ago and, given the independent nature of the investigation, I have limited knowledge of the details regarding this matter,” said Chief Jim Cessford. “Also, considering the fact that this matter is now before the courts I am not in a position to make any comment relative to the charges against Cst. MacWilliams.”

Story continues below advertisement

Read the full open letter from Delta police Chief Constable Jim Cessford:

This morning, Constable Jordan MacWilliams was charged with Second Degree murder as a result of a fatal shooting during a police incident at the Starlight Casino in New Westminster. This incident occurred almost two years ago and, given the independent nature of the investigation, I am not aware of many of the details regarding the file. I will say that I respect and understand the role of Crown Counsel and the Independent Investigations Office; I do support civilian oversight and believe it is a necessary function of maintaining public trust and confidence.

Because this matter is now before the courts, I am not in a position to make any comment relative to the charges against Jordan. This is a difficult situation and my thoughts are with Jordan and his family. While we have no control over the process or its outcome, we do have the ability to support Jordan, as his friends and colleagues, while he faces these challenging times.

I must also caution you that many police officers, including members from this department, will be testifying in court on this case. It is not appropriate for us to be discussing the details of our involvement with any one. Any of these discussions could be subject of disclosure and open to question during the trial.

In light of what has happened, it is important that we continue to be proud of who we are and the integral role we play in society. We sign on to this job knowing that we will face risk. In our experiences we know that while it can be dangerous and difficult, it can also be remarkable. I believe that none of us starts our tour of duty with the intention of causing harm to another person; in fact our singular focus is to keep our citizens safe, and deal with crime and public disorder. I believe that when difficult or adverse decisions are made, we must hold our heads high and continue to maintain the integrity of our profession. Most importantly, we must support each other through the good times and the bad.

Story continues below advertisement

As police officers, we are called upon to make instantaneous, life-or-death decisions. We sometimes encounter violent situations that force us to react in a manner to protect the public and ourselves. These decisions will be the subject of intense examination by governing bodies, who will hold us accountable to our actions for years thereafter. While no other profession is under the microscope to the same degree as policing, no other role in society is granted the same powers as the police. With our powers, we must also accept scrutiny.

One of our core values is Courage; defined as our ability to overcome adversity. Now is the time for us to show tremendous courage and leadership.

 

Sponsored content