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Drugs, alcohol being investigated in 4-vehicle crash on Calgary’s Stoney Trail

Drugs and alcohol are being investigated as possible factors in a four-vehicle collision on Stoney Trail N.E. Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2024. Jeff McIntosh / The Canadian Press

Drugs and alcohol are being investigated as factors in a crash involving four vehicles in northeast Calgary Wednesday evening.

The crash happened in the area of Stoney Trail N.E. just north of the interchange with Country Hills Boulevard N.E. at about 6 p.m.

Police said a grey 2005 Toyota Echo being driven by a 28-year-old man was stopped on the north shoulder of Stoney Trail when a grey 2007 Toyota Yaris being driven by a 21-year-old woman was heading north along the roadway. As the Yaris was heading north, the Echo pulled into traffic, and the two vehicles collided.

The Yaris also collided with the back end of a black 2019 GMC Yukon, which was being driven by a 44-year-old woman. The Yukon was also heading north on Stoney Trail at the time.

As the Yukon steered around the Echo, it was struck by a 2021 BMW X3, which was travelling behind the Yukon, according to police. The BMW was being driven by a 35-year-old man.

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The BMW stopped on the south shoulder, while the Yukon carried on driving on Stoney Trail.

Police said both the Yaris and the Echo came to “uncontrolled stops” in the south media.

The 21-year-old woman driving the Yaris suffered serious injuries.

Police said the 28-year-old man driving the Echo sustained serious, life-threatening injuries.

The drivers of the BMW and Yukon were not injured, according to police.

Police said alcohol and drugs are being investigated as factors in the collision for the driver of the Echo.

Anyone with information about the collision, or anyone who may have dashcam video of the crash, is asked to contact the Calgary Police Service at 403-266-1234. Anonymous tips can be submitted to Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or online.

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