February 3, 2016 4:06 pm
Updated: February 3, 2016 8:43 pm

As Canada signs TPP, trade minister Freeland says feds studying economic impacts

WATCH ABOVE: Canada’s minister of international trade signs TPP deal in New Zealand


OTTAWA – The federal government is studying the potential economic impacts of the controversial Trans-Pacific Partnership, Canada’s international trade minister confirmed Wednesday.

Chrystia Freeland was in New Zealand on Wednesday where she signed the massive 12-country Pacific Rim treaty, a deal opponents warn could eliminate Canadian jobs and damage some sectors of the economy.

That signature comes before the government has finished assessing the economic costs and benefits the deal potentially holds for Canada, she acknowledged.

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READ MORE: New poll finds many Canadians unaware of what’s in the TPP deal

But Freeland has also said on multiple occasions that signing the deal does not necessarily mean ratification, a final step that is up to two years away.

The Liberals have billed the signature as a “technical step” that will allow Canada to stay at the bargaining table.

In the meantime, the government is taking a closer look the TPP’s potential consequences, Freeland acknowledged Wednesday in a conference call from Auckland prior to signing the agreement.

“That is a very important part of the analysis and of the conversation that Canadians need to have,” she said.

“It’s a big job and we are working on it.”

WATCH: PM Justin Trudeau, NDP Leader Mulcair discuss TPP deal, impact on Canadians

Freeland has also requested a thorough study of the agreement by a parliamentary committee and has conducted public consultations. Now that the deal is signed, only a majority vote in Parliament would seal its ratification.

In a statement that followed the signing, U.S. ambassador Bruce Heyman predicted the deal would help small businesses grow, create jobs and pay higher wages.

“The agreement also includes strong and enforceable provisions that will promote higher labour standards in TPP countries,” Heyman said.

“These higher standards will pave the way for a race to the top, providing other nations an incentive to raise their standards and giving North American workers and businesses a fair shot in one of the world’s fastest-growing regions.”

During question period Wednesday, the Liberals came under pressure from the opposition New Democrats, who demanded to know why the government would sign the accord without first exploring its potential consequences.

NDP Leader Tom Mulcair also asked if the government will make its findings public.

© 2016 The Canadian Press

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