January 29, 2016 2:41 pm
Updated: March 24, 2016 1:14 pm

Jian Ghomeshi trial: What you need to know as the trial begins

Jian Ghomeshi: a timeline of the former radio host’s fall from grace

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UPDATED TIMELINE: Jian Ghomeshi sex assault scandal

The trial of disgraced former CBC radio host Jian Ghomeshi is set to begin Monday where he will face five charges, including four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking.

The names of the complainants in the case are covered by a publication ban with exception of actress and Royal Canadian Air Force officer Lucy DeCoutere who agreed to have her identity revealed.

READ MORE: What is ‘overcome resistance – choking?’

The former host of the radio show Q, was fired by the CBC in 2014 after network executives claimed to have seen graphic evidence that he had physically injured a woman.

WATCH: Preview of the Jian Ghomeshi trial

The 48-year-old is charged with seven counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking. The Crown withdrew two sexual assault charges on May. 12, 2015 because they said there was no reasonable prospect of conviction. He was freed on $100,000 bail on conditions he remains in Ontario and live with his mother.

As the high-profile trial gets underway here is a look at everything you need to know:

Timeline

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Friday, Oct. 24, 2014

CBC spokesperson Chuck Thompson confirms reports that Jian Ghomeshi, the host of Q, is taking time off from his duties at the broadcaster “to deal with some personal issues.”

Sunday, Oct. 26, 2014

CBC says in a statement the network has parted ways with Ghomeshi. Ghomeshi details his account of the events in a Facebook post, saying the CBC fired him because of “a campaign of false allegations.”

“I’ve been fired from the CBC because of the risk of my private sex life being made public as a result of a campaign of false allegations pursued by a jilted ex girlfriend and a freelance writer,” Ghomeshi claimed on Facebook.

He also says that while he engaged in “rough sex” and “adventurous forms of sex that included role-play, dominance and submission,” he only participated in sexual practices that were “mutually agreed upon, consensual, and exciting for both partners.”

READ MORE: Jian Ghomeshi trial set to begin

“The implication may be made that this happens non-consensually. And that will be a lie,” read the post.

The Toronto Star publishes a story by Kevin Donovan and CANADALAND’s Jesse Brown with allegations from three women who say Ghomeshi was physically violent without their consent before and during sexual encounters.

Monday, Oct. 27, 2014

Ghomeshi files a $55 million lawsuit, alleging breach of confidence, bad faith and defamation by the public broadcaster.

Wednesday, Oct. 29, 2014

The Toronto Star publishes another article with accusations from eight women who claim violence, sexual abuse or harassment by Ghomeshi.

Lucy DeCoutere, an actress on the TV show “Trailer Park Boys,” is the first to be publicly identified. She accused Ghomeshi of choking her “to the point she could not breathe” and slapping her “hard three times on the side of her head.”

 

“Because it was a date, we started kissing, which was very normal. And then at a certain point he pressed me against the wall with my throat and then he slapped me, which was not invited,” DeCoutere told Global News in an interview.

 “Neither was it discussed or suggested, and therefore there was no way that that could be consensual.”

The Star article also details two accounts from women who said once in his home, Ghomeshi “introduced them to Big Ears Teddy, a stuffed bear, and he turned the bear around just before he slapped or choked them, saying that ‘Big Ears Teddy shouldn’t see this.’”

READ MORE: Jian Ghomeshi says he’ll ‘meet allegations directly’

Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014.

Navigator, the crisis communication firm retained by Ghomeshi since the summer of 2014, and Rock-It promotions, Ghomeshi’s long-time PR representation, both announce they have cut ties with him.

In a second post to Facebook, Ghomeshi says he intends to “meet these allegations directly.”

Lawyer and author Reva Seth writes in the Huffington Post Ghomeshi allegedly assaulted her during a date that seemed normal at first, and started with kissing before he “suddenly” changed.

READ MORE: Jian Ghomeshi pleads not guilty to sex assault, choking charges

Toronto Police Chief Bill Blair asks anyone who has been a victim of sexual assault to come forward to the police. Blair says his force isn’t actively investigating Ghomeshi because no one has come forward to police.

Friday, Oct. 31, 2014

The CBC alleges “graphic” evidence that Ghomeshi had injured someone prompted the public broadcaster to fire him.

Toronto Police formally launch an investigation into Jian Ghomeshi allegations.

Tuesay, Nov. 4, 2014.

The Star reports a male former student at York University alleged Ghomeshi “grabbed my genitals and fondled them.”

Janice Rubin, an employment lawyer, is hired to lead an independent investigation at the CBC.

READ MORE: Police chief urges sexual assault victims to come forward

Wednesday, Nov. 5, 2014

Ghomeshi hires criminal defence Lawyer Marie Henein amid assault and sexual abuse allegations. Henein is a well-known attorney for securing acquittals. She represented former Ontario attorney general Michael Bryant, whose charges in the death of a bicycle courier were dropped.

CBC files a notice of motion requesting Ghomeshi’s lawsuit be dropped.

Friday, Nov. 7, 2014

CBC executive vice-president of English services Heather Conway says a complaint filed in 2010 by a woman who worked with Ghomeshi was “clearly mishandled.”

Conway said managers at CBC made “some efforts” to intervene and improve the work environment at Q but failed to do so.

Wednesday, Nov. 12

CBC claims Ghomeshi was fired after he allegedly showed executives a video depicting bruising on a woman he had dated, apparently caused by a cracked rib.

Tuesday, Nov. 25, 2014

The $55-million lawsuit against the CBC is dropped by Ghomeshi.

WATCH: Labour law expert says Jian Ghomeshi’s CBC lawsuit was ‘frivolous from its inception’

Wednesday, Nov. 26, 2014

Toronto Police charged Ghomeshi with four counts of sexual assault and one count of “overcome resistance – choking.” He was released on $100,000 bail and ordered to live with his mother.

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Kathryn Borel identified herself in The Guardian as the colleague first quoted in an Oct. 26 Toronto Star article whose yawn at a 2007 staff meeting resulted in Ghomeshi allegedly saying, “I want to hate f— you, to wake you up.”

Borel alleged there were “uninvited back massages,” and describes an incident in which Ghomeshi grabbed her waist from behind in front of a co-worker and “repeatedly thrust his crotch” into her

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Three new charges are laid against Ghomeshi at a brief court appearance; his lawyer says he will plead not guilty. The identities of the new alleged victims are covered by a publication ban.

Wednesday, April 15, 2015

The CBC announced a rebrand for the program Ghomeshi hosted, changing the name of the show from Q to q and named Toronto rapper Shad as the new host.

Thursday, April 16, 2015

CBC released the Janice Rubin report on how the public broadcaster handled the Jian Ghomeshi scandal, roughly six months after it was commissioned.

Rubin interviewed dozens of CBC employees for the report and concluded that CBC management should have known or should have done more with what they did know about Ghomeshi’s “problematic behaviour.”

Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Crown prosecutors dropped two of seven sexual assault charges against Ghomeshi. Two trial dates are set for February and June of 2016. The trials will be conducted by judge only.

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Ghomeshi pleads not guilty to five charges, including four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance, choking.

Monday Feb. 1, 2016

Ghomeshi’s trial is set to begin where he faces five charges, including four counts of sexual assault and one count of overcoming resistance by choking.

*With files from Erika Tucker and The Canadian Press

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