July 5, 2014 7:57 pm

Sask. premier asks feds for $100M advance for disaster assistance

After days of severe weather battering much of southeastern Saskatchewan, there is news of some relief.

Sean Lerat-Stetner / Global News

REGINA – After days of severe weather battering much of southeastern Saskatchewan, there is news of some relief.

The province announced water levels across Saskatchewan are rising slower than expected, but there are still challenges for people who live near lakes.

“It’s clear that some properties along the lake have seen significant damage,” said Duane McKay, commissioner of emergency management for Saskatchewan.

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This, after an embankment built on Highway 22 gave way, and unleashed more water into Crooked Lake Friday. Levels there, peaked overnight; tying with the highest ever recorded.

READ MORE: Crooked Lake residents desperate to save homes

Round Lake is also on the province’s radar, with levels expected to break records over the next two days.

All this excess water is also affecting drinking water in nine communities.

Melville was one of the first communities to declare a state of emergency last Sunday. It’s now the first to open up a regional recovery centre. About 200 people have used the centre so far.

Another centre is expected to open up for the Carnduff and Gainsborough area later next week.

Meanwhile, the 24/7 farm stress line has been converted to a flood stress line.

NEED TO KNOW: Important Saskatchewan flood contact numbers

“These are catastrophic events in the life of anyone, and so, while we were grateful on the physical health side for what we’ve seen in the aftermath here, you know the mental health issue is a concern,” said Premier Brad Wall Saturday morning.

Wall requested a $100 million advance on disaster relief from Prime Minister Stephen Harper – the same amount Saskatchewan received after the 2011 flooding.

The total damage is expected to cost at least $360 million.

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