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Satisfaction with N.B. government under Blaine Higgs on the decline: survey

Click to play video: 'New Brunswick premier says province may consider rebate due to rising fuel prices' New Brunswick premier says province may consider rebate due to rising fuel prices
New Brunswick Premier Blaine Higgs may be considering a rebate to deal with the skyrocketing price of gas. Higgs says the option is on the table, but it all depends on if the government sees greater than expected profits from record prices. Silas Brown reports – May 12, 2022

A new survey finds satisfaction with the performance of the New Brunswick government, led by PC Premier Blaine Higgs, has declined compared with three months ago.

The latest survey by Narrative Research found 40 per cent of residents are currently satisfied with the government’s performance, compared to 47 per cent three months ago.

Back then, overall satisfaction was described as “partially rebounded” following a “dramatic” decline in support in late 2021.

In November 2021, the satisfaction rate was 31 per cent.

Read more: Satisfaction in N.B. government has ‘partially rebounded,’ poll suggests

On the flip side, 52 per cent are currently dissatisfied, compared to 47 per cent three months ago.

However, voting intentions appear to remain stable. Currently, one-third of respondents would vote for the PCs if an election were held today, which is unchanged from the last survey.

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The same proportion — 34 per cent — would vote for the Liberals. That’s up from 31 per cent.

Seventeen per cent would vote for the Green Party, nine per cent would vote for the NDP, and four per cent would vote for the People’s Alliance of New Brunswick.

The survey noted preference for premier also remains stable. Twenty-two per cent of those polled would prefer Higgs as premier, 21 per cent would choose Roger Melanson of the Liberals and 18 per cent would prefer David Coon from the Green Party.

The results of the survey are part of Halifax-based Narrative Research’s Atlantic Quarterly, and was drawn from a sample of 607 adult New Brunswickers conducted over telephone.

The results are accurate to within plus or minus 4.0 percentage points, 95 out of 100 times.

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