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EPIC career fair gives Alberta high school students an interactive experience

Career fair gives Lethbridge-area high school students an interactive experience
WATCH ABOVE: Nearly 500 high school kids from eight different school divisions all gathered in Lethbridge at Exhibition Park on Wednesday for one epic experience hosted by Career Transitions. Quinn Campbell explains.

Nearly 500 high school kids from eight different school divisions all gathered in Lethbridge at Exhibition Park on Wednesday for one EPIC experience hosted by Career Transitions.

Grade 11 student Kiara Van Bostelen said the event was eye-opening.

“We went to the home inspector over there and that was pretty cool, a very used job. Then we went to the masons and it was fun and very hands-on, and now we are at the chef’s station.”

The event is called EPIC, which stands for Exploring Possible Industries and Careers.

READ MORE: Southern Alberta students attend leadership conference in Lethbridge

Judy Stolk-Ingram said the event is a great way for students to get a glimpse into what a future career could offer.

“We want them to learn about these future career pathways so that when they get to the point that they’re finished high school, that they have a better idea of what their next step might be.”

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Students could explore four different sectors: environment and agriculture, health, trades, and STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics).

“Career exploration at this level is about a starting point, it’s about helping kids to understand what’s there,” Stolk-Ingram said.

“Nobody can predict what they are going to retire from, especially for youth from today, many of these kids here today are going to be working in occupations that haven’t even been invented yet.”

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Roughly 80 exhibitors took part in the event, giving them an opportunity to showcase what their field has to offer.

“A lot of times when we ask what they think an ironworker does, we get a welder. It is an aspect of ironworking but there is a whole lot more to it, so we basically just introduce them to stuff ironworkers,” said ironworker Kris Chambers.

The event proving to be a one stop shop to careers many have never considered.

“It’s actually very interesting,” Van Bostelen said. “It piques your interest and then you’re like, ‘Well maybe I want to consider this.'”