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N.S. government hires 2 companies to help remove collapsed construction crane

2 companies hired by N.S. government to help with collapsed crane
The Transportation Department has announced it is hiring two companies to move forward with work to bring down the collapsed crane on South Park Street. Alicia Draus has more.

Taxpayers may be on the hook for removing the toppled crane on South Park Street in Halifax.

The Nova Scotia Department of Transportation now says it’s hiring two companies to move forward with work to remove the crane. Harbourside Engineering Consultants and R&D Crane Operator Limited and their subcontractors will now receive protection against claims of damage that may result from their work to remove the crane, according to the province.

READ MORE: N.S. declares localized state of emergency to ensure removal of downed crane

The move comes less than a week after declaring a localized state of emergency at the site, which allowed the province to take on liability for any damage caused during the removal process.

The goal was to speed up the removal process as there were questions over insurance. At the time of the announcement, Nova Scotia Minister of Labour Labi Kousoulis said the cost of removing the crane was being covered by the company which owns the crane.

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WATCH: Evacuees left in the dark after Halifax crane collapse

Evacuees left in the dark after Halifax crane collapse
Evacuees left in the dark after Halifax crane collapse

The provincial government says it is moving the project forward “in the interest of public safety.”

READ MORE: ‘Hurry up’: Small Halifax businesses lose profits, employees due to toppled crane delays

Neither the Department of Transportation or the Department of Emergency Management was available for comment to answer questions on why the province has decided to pay for the removal of the crane, or indicate how much it could cost taxpayers.

The Department of Transportation is saying the government will make every effort to recover its cost, though it’s unclear that can be done without going through the courts.