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What Canadians want to know about what’s in fast food meals

Are your fries made out of plastic? Do you use pink slime? How is it that a McDonald’s burger does not rot? Canadians came by the thousands, asking fast food giant McDonald’s to answer a string of questions from how its food is made, if the ingredients are “real” and why the meals don’t seem to expire. Screen grab/Global News

TORONTO – Are your fries made out of plastic? Do you use pink slime? How is it that a McDonald’s burger does not rot?

Canadians came by the thousands, asking fast food giant McDonald’s to answer a string of questions from how its food is made, if the ingredients are “real” and why the meals don’t seem to expire.

It’s been a year since the corporation launched its risky “Our Food. Your Questions” campaign. And so far, Canadians took to grilling the company – 20,063 questions were asked and the project’s site received more than a million unique visits north of the border.

The fast food chain says it took on the project to “reclaim the truth.”

“After listening carefully to our customers and identifying some of the challenges we were up against, McDonald’s created a transparent line of communication via the interactive, online Q&A platform,” the company said in a statement to Global News.

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Take a look at the top 10 questions Canadians had for the fast food giant:

Screen grab/Global News
Screen grab/Global News
Screen grab/Global News
What Canadians want to know about what’s in fast food meals - image
Screen grab/McDonald's
Screen grab/McDonald's

McDonald’s provided this Canuck’s question with a video to “prove” the eggs in these breakfast sandwiches are real.

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Screen grab/Global News
Screen grab/McDonald's
Screen grab/Global News
Supplied photo/McDonald's
Screen grab/McDonald's

Read through the complete questions and answers here.

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Photos provided by McDonald’s or taken as screen grabs by Global News.

Read more: Measuring meals by exercise, not calories helps consumers eat healthy: study

Sound off: Did McDonald’s campaign help you trust in its food quality? Tell us what you think on Facebook.

carmen.chai@globalnews.ca

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