Advertisement

As MMIWG testimony wraps in St. John’s, commission to ‘make do’ with short extension for work

Marion Buller, Chief Commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, pauses while speaking to a reporter after a news conference at Haida House at the Museum of Anthropology, in Vancouver on Thursday, July 6, 2017.
Marion Buller, Chief Commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, pauses while speaking to a reporter after a news conference at Haida House at the Museum of Anthropology, in Vancouver on Thursday, July 6, 2017. The Canadian Press/Darryl Dyck

The chief commissioner of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls says she hasn’t seen much progress from the federal government since the inquiry’s critical interim report was published last year.

The inquiry is hearing its final testimony on Thursday in St. John’s, N.L., with witnesses calling for authorities to include sexual exploitation survivors in policing and protection of victims of human trafficking.

READ MORE: Police tell MMIWG inquiry that human trafficking is an under-reported source of violence

The inquiry had requested a two-year extension earlier this year, but the federal government allotted six months.

Chief commissioner Marion Buller praised the strength and honesty of families and survivors who testified during the lengthy hearing process, and said the inquiry will have to make do with the short extension that she says is not enough time to satisfactorily complete the job.

Story continues below advertisement

Parties with standing will give their final submissions at public events in Calgary and Ottawa later this year, before the commissioners write their final report.

Testifying Thursday are Rachel Willan, a violence and trafficking survivor, Diane Redsky, a Manitoba community outreach leader, and Chief Danny Smyth and Staff-Sgt. Darryl Ramkissoon of Winnipeg police.