June 3, 2018 3:34 pm

Ruffled feathers over residents feeding feral peacocks in Surrey neighbourhood

Residents in Surrey say peacocks who set up home in their neighbourhood are a big nuisance. As Julia Foy reports, the problem is made worse by a homeowner who feeds the bird encouraging them to stick around.

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The war of words over problem peafowl in a Surrey neighbourhood is escalating.

For years, a muster of feral peacocks had been a fixture of the Sullivan Heights area at 150th Street and 62nd Avenue, but their place in the neighbourhood was changed after a homeowner cut down the tree where they made their home.

Residents contend another neighbour is feeding and providing shelter to the birds year-round.

The City of Surrey says the homeowner has been slapped with up to $2,000 in fines, and may be taken to court.

WATCH: Surrey tree cut down where peacocks made their nest

“Feeding the birds not permitted at all, so we have taken action against that property owner and will continue to investigate,” Jaspreet Rehal with the City of Surrey said.

The peafowl have been a source of tension in the neighbourhood.

Residents say lovelorn peacocks are scratching up their shiny cars.

“They can see their reflection in it really well and right now it’s mating season, so when they look at the car they see [the reflection] as a competing male,” resident Ryan Cragg said.

WATCH: How did peacocks become a staple of this Surrey community?


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In May, a battle broke out between homeowners when one neighbour cut down a tree where several birds roosted each night.

“So many people stopped talking to each other because of this problem,” resident Jatinder Shergill said. “Our community is kind of divided.”

The city is planning a community meeting for next month.

But as time drags on, the peacock population continues to grow.

Residents have been putting fishing line above window wells to stop peahens from going in to nest.

One neighbour doesn’t seem to mind. For the second year in a row, a peahen has laid eggs on Jerry Barr’s front doorstep and his family loves it.

“We moved into their neighbourhood,” he said. “It’s like moving near an airport and complaining about the airport noise.”

— With files from Julia Foy and Jesse Ferreras

© 2018 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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