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U of S researchers say they can better predict storms caused by rising temps

University of Saskatchewan researchers said they've seen temperatures rise up to 8 C in winter over the last 50 years in the Northwest Territories. Mark Ferguson / University of Saskatchewan

Researchers say they’ve come up with a way to better predict severe storms and protect infrastructure caused by increasing temperatures in Western Canada.

Researchers from the University of Saskatchewan (U of S) said they’ve seen temperatures rise up to 8 C in winter over the last 50 years in the Northwest Territories.

READ MORE: University of Saskatchewan leading 9 projects to address future water challenges

At the same time, temperatures across the Prairies have risen two to three degrees overall.

Water resources professor John Pomeroy said they have come up with a more precise model to predict what the future could look like as water levels continually change.

WATCH: A new documentary from the Changing Cold Regions Network outlines how climate change is affecting the Prairies.

Click to play video: 'Documentary outlines the changing climate in Western Canada' Documentary outlines the changing climate in Western Canada
Documentary outlines the changing climate in Western Canada – Mar 7, 2018

Pomeroy said there is 14 times more water flowing out of eastern Saskatchewan now than in the 1970s and 1980s.

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He said their research can help in designing municipal reservoirs to store water in the spring for periods of summer drought.

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