March 22, 2013 12:13 pm
Updated: March 24, 2013 9:42 pm

West Kelowna man claims Smart Meters are killing him

They say the problems began after a group of smart meters were installed by BC Hydro in front of their home last year -- coincidentally around the same time Jerry had his first stroke.

Global Okanagan/Jeff Martin
A A

It’s not the first time people have raised concerns about the health effects of smart meters.

But an Okanagan man claims the meters may be interfering with an important medical device – his pacemaker.

Jerry Smith, 70, of West Kelowna is partially paralyzed as a result of the 10 strokes he’s had since last August.

“I’m scared of getting more strokes. The doctor said I’m a walking time bomb.”

Smith also lost almost 90 pounds and can no longer do anything except lie around.

Story continues below

Things weren’t always so bleak. Last year, his health actually got better after he had a pacemaker put in.

“He had more energy,” says Smith’s wife Joyce. “He felt better.”

Then things began things began to deteriorate.

“The last one (stroke) was a really bad one,” says Joyce.

Doctors told the couple they weren’t sure why the strokes were happening. But the couple has their own theory.

They say the problems began after a group of smart meters were installed by BC Hydro in front of their home last year — coincidentally around the same time Jerry had his first stroke.

They believe the smart meters are interfering with his pacemaker.

“They (BC Hydro) put the smart meters in and when I came home from the hospital I just felt myself going downhill. I had another stroke,” says Smith.

In recent years there have been numerous anti-smart meter campaigns not only in B.C., but across North America.
And despite overwhelming evidence by public health officials, Health Canada and even the World Health Organization — labeling smart meters safe, there are still many who feel otherwise. But BC Hydro insists they’re safe.

“We had an independent consulting firm study smart meters and how frequently they’re communicating and that study showed they communicate on average of 1.4 seconds per day,” says BC Hydro spokesman Dag Sharman. “Not only is the frequency insignificant, but they’re not on very often at all.”

BC Hydro will be sending a group of engineers to conduct tests on Smith’s meters next week.

Report an error

Comments

Want to discuss? Please read our Commenting Policy first.