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Disturbing video from Sagkeeng First Nation part of growing online trend: Psychologist

Click to play video: 'Disturbing video from Sagkeeng First Nation part of growing online trend: Psychologist' Disturbing video from Sagkeeng First Nation part of growing online trend: Psychologist
WATCH: A disturbing video out of Sagkeeng First Nation is the latest in a 'trend' of disturbing videos being posted to social media. Global's Shelden Rogers reports. – Apr 27, 2017

WINNIPEG — A disturbing video out of Sagkeeng First Nation has been taken down by Facebook, but a local psychologist said this likely won’t be the last time we see a crime broadcast on social media.

RELATED: Manitoba First Nation trying to cope after murder of 19-year-old

The video appears to show 19-year-old Serena McKay being kicked and punched in the head by her attackers. The graphic beating was captured on cell phone video, something Dr. Syras Derksen said is becoming popular.

“The amount of hits and views they can get through these experiences can become very rewarding for people,” Derksen said.

Two girls aged 16 and 17 are facing second degree murder charges. Derksen said the reason the suspects would capture the attack on video could be many things, but it is likely due to past experiences.

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The death of 19-year-old Serene Mckay has rocked the Manitoba First Nation it happened on.
The death of 19-year-old Serene Mckay has rocked the Manitoba First Nation it happened on. File / Global News

“I would be very surprised if this was the first thing they’d ever done like this. I would be expecting there to be some kind of criminal assault towards them or by them,” he said.

RELATED: Two teen girls arrested for second degree murder in death of missing Manitoba woman

He said some people also like to share themselves committing a crime to receive some sort of recognition.

“Sometimes the goal becomes to become known, to become connected through crime. Through anti-social acts, through breaking the rules.”

RELATED: Winnipeg man charged in live stream sexual assault of 6-year-old

The video has been shared throughout the province and beyond. High school student Shay Barron said she saw the video pop up on her Facebook feed, and decided to watch.

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“I just wanted to know what happened. Like why did they beat her up,” she said.

Derksen said as humans, it’s completely natural to feel the need to click on videos like the one coming from Sagkeeng First Nation.

WATCH: Sagkeeng First Nation still reeling after murder of a 19-year-old high school student. Global’s Shelden Rogers was in the First Nation Wednesday.

Click to play video: 'Manitoba First Nation trying to cope after murder of 19-year-old' Manitoba First Nation trying to cope after murder of 19-year-old
Manitoba First Nation trying to cope after murder of 19-year-old – Apr 26, 2017

“There’s definitely a curiosity, there’s a diffusion of responsibility, and I think people are also concerned,” Derksen said.

RELATED: Winnipeg police arrest 3 people after assault live streamed on social media

Now that the video has been taken down by Facebook, Derksen said people should be cautious when browsing through their social media feeds, as broadcasting crimes becomes more popular.

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“I would expect that this is likely going to continue and maybe increase as people see others gaining celebrity through it.”

A Facebook spokesperson issued a statement Thursday afternoon that said “all instances of the video” had been pulled down.

“This was a horrific tragedy, and our hearts go out to the family and friends of Ms. McKay. We are working with law enforcement as they investigate,” the statement read.

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