June 22, 2016 2:57 pm
Updated: June 22, 2016 5:10 pm

Toronto Maple Leafs seek trademark challenge against Snoop Dogg pot logo

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The parent company of the Toronto Maple Leafs is dropping the gloves in a trademark fight with rapper-turned-marijuana entrepreneur Snoop Dogg over his “Leafs by Snoop” line of pot products.

At issue is the gold-leaf logo with white lettering used by the Snoop Dogg-branded smokeable and edible weed items, which Snoop — real name Calvin Broadus — is seeking to trademark for use in cigarette lighters.

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But Maple Leaf Sports and Entertainment apparently sees Snoop’s product marker as being too similar to the Maple Leaf’s classic blue-and-white logo, and are taking their dispute to U.S. trademark referees.

READ MORE: Ontario marijuana producer Tweed strikes business deal with Snoop Dogg

Documents filed with the United States Patent and Trademark Office show MLSE listed as a potential opponent to the application, and earlier this month it was granted a 90-day extension to consider submitting a formal notice of opposition.

The delay request was made by an NHL lawyer on behalf of MLSE, and the trademark documents do not offer a reason for the challenge.

MLSE declined comment when contacted by Global News, while an NHL spokesperson could not be reached. Snoop Dogg’s trademark lawyer did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The rapper and prodigious pot smoker launched his cannabis line last November in Colorado — one of several investments he’s made in the blossoming marijuana industry. Among the “Leafs by Snoop” products are marijuana flowers, chocolate bars and “Dogg Treats” gummies.

Earlier this year Snoop Dogg inked a deal with Ontario marijuana producer Tweed giving the company exclusive rights to use certain content and brands owned by the rapper’s company, LBC Holdings.

With files from Andrew Russell

© 2016 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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