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Megan Leslie not jumping into NDP leadership race

NDP MP Megan Leslie asks a question during Question Period in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Thursday, March 26, 2015.
NDP MP Megan Leslie asks a question during Question Period in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Thursday, March 26, 2015. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Former NDP MP Megan Leslie will not be seeking the party’s leadership.

The Halifax native told Global News she will not put her name forward as New Democrats look for a new leader.

The party has given itself two years to select a new leader, until that time, Tom Mulcair will stay on in his current role.

READ MORE: Nathan Cullen hints he may enter race to be new NDP leader

“The future is bright,” Leslie said when asked about a possible return to politics, adding she has not ruled it out.

Leslie lost her seat in the Last October’s federal election as the Liberal party took every seat in Atlantic Canada. She’s taking a break from politics but remains a part of the party.

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READ MORE: Who will replace Tom Mulcair as NDP leader? It could be a crowded field

Leslie was one of the nearly 1,800 delegates at the NDP convention in Edmonton this past weekend. Members voted 52 per cent in favour of having a leadership race.

She said was inspired by Stephen Lewis’ Saturday evening speech in which he reminded New Democrats what left-wing politics should look like.

READ MORE: Tom Mulcair to stay on as NDP leader for now, with caucus support

Alberta NDP leader Rachel Notley‘s spoke Saturday and Leslie said it was “one of the best political speeches” she’s ever heard.

Notley took some shots at the controversial Leap Manifesto while asserting her government’s plan to develop natural resources in an environmentally responsible way.

The Leap Manifesto calls for an end to all pipeline construction while putting more emphasis on renewable energy. The delegates didn’t adopt the manifesto but did endorse the spirit of the document, agreeing to study it at the riding level and continue to debate whether or not it should become part of the party’s policy.