February 25, 2016 11:30 am
Updated: February 25, 2016 11:31 am

Government computer edits Cadbury Caramilk’s Wikipedia page, says it’s not chocolate

An apparent candy connoisseur used a computer at the Department of National Defence (DND) to edit Cadbury Caramilk’s Wikipedia page to dispute whether the bar meets “the legal definition of a chocolate.”

Handout/Cadbury
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An apparent candy connoisseur used a computer at the Department of National Defence (DND) to edit Cadbury Caramilk’s Wikipedia page to dispute whether the bar meets “the legal definition of a chocolate.”

The Wikipedia edit was anonymously made on Tuesday by someone with the Internet Protocol (IP) address of the department of defence. The user tweaked the description of Caramilk from “chocolate bar” to “candy bar.”

“The Caramilk bar does not meet the legal definition of a chocolate bar in Canada due to the use of vegetable oils in production,” reads the Wikipedia revision. “This probably extends to the U.S. as well, where it would have to be labeled as Chocolatey or ‘made with chocolate.’”

The DND web address was flagged on Twitter by @gccaedits, a bot that automatically tweets Wikipedia edits made from Canadian government IP address.


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According to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s labelling requirements for chocolate and cocoa products, “candies and candy bars coated with chocolate or milk chocolate should not be called ‘chocolate candies’ or ‘chocolate bars,’ but can be named ‘chocolate coated candies’ or ‘chocolate coated bars’, as applicable.

“Only a solid chocolate candy, bar, etc., can be labelled ‘Chocolate Candy’ or ‘Chocolate Bar.’”

The CFIA website points to Division 4 of the Food and Drug Regulations where it stipulates that “chocolate” must be made with coca liquor and cocoa butter and or cocoa powder.

According to the list of ingredients, Caramilks are made with three types of oil: modified palm oil, modified vegetable oil and vegetable oil. However, cocoa butter and unsweetened chocolate are listed as ingredients as well.

Now, one can argue that since cocoa butter and unsweetened chocolate are used in the making of a Caramilk, then the chocolate is “pure,” but it still can’t be called a chocolate bar as it’s not solid chocolate.

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