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9 planets? NASA responds to claim another planet lurks in solar system

Click to play video 'Scientists on the trail of Planet 9 in outer space' Scientists on the trail of Planet 9 in outer space
WATCH: There's a new hypothesis about what could be a new planet. While no one has actually seen it yet, as Eric Sorensen reports, scientists are hot on its trail.

A new study that suggests there is a massive additional planet roaming our solar system has garnered a lot of attention, including NASA’s.

The rumoured planet — believed to be more massive than Neptune, with an orbit between 10,000 to 20,000 years — has yet to be observed: it’s only been theorized to explain the movement of other bodies at the outer reaches of our solar system.

WATCH: Astronomers talk about evidence of 9th planet in our solar system
Click to play video 'Astronomers talk about evidence of 9th planet in our solar system' Astronomers talk about evidence of 9th planet in our solar system
Astronomers talk about evidence of 9th planet in our solar system

But that doesn’t mean we can break out the bubbly yet, warns Caltech astronomer Konstatin Batygin.

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“This is a prediction,” he says. “What we have found is a gravitational signature of Planet 9 lurking in the outskirts of the solar system. We have not found the object itself,” he stressed, adding that the actual discovery when it happens will be “era-defining.”

WATCH: NASA comments on evidence that suggests there is another massive planet within our solar system.
Click to play video 'NASA Director discusses possibility of ‘Planet 9’ in our solar system' NASA Director discusses possibility of ‘Planet 9’ in our solar system
NASA Director discusses possibility of ‘Planet 9’ in our solar system

Jim Green, director of planetary science at NASA addressed the new findings.

“The January 20 paper in the Astronomical Journal is fueling our interest in planetary exploration,” Green said. “Stimulating a  healthy debate that’s part of the scientific process.”

“It is not, however, the detection of a new planet. It’s too early to say with certainty that there’s a so-called ‘Planet X’ out there.”

The new study by Batygin and fellow Caltech astronomer Mike Brown was published on Monday in the Astronomical Journal.

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