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Windows 10 will be the last version of Windows

This image provided by Microsoft shows the start menu of Windows 10, the company's next version of its flagship operating system. .
This image provided by Microsoft shows the start menu of Windows 10, the company's next version of its flagship operating system. . AP Photo/Microsoft

TORONTO – Microsoft has confirmed Windows 10 will be the last major release of its flagship operating system – but that doesn’t mean Windows is extinct.

The software giant is switching its approach to Windows – from now on the operating system will been seen as “a service” that will be updated with new features and updates on an ongoing basis.

Windows 10 will be updated as necessary, rolling out regular updates and improvements instead of big releases.

“Right now we’re releasing Windows 10, and because Windows 10 is the last version of Windows, we’re all still working on Windows 10,” said developer evangelist Jerry Nixon during last week’s Microsoft’s Ignite conference in Chicago.

The new structure will see Windows operate more like Google’s Chrome browser. Updates to Chrome usually happen in the background of the browser and features are turned on as Google adds them – the user doesn’t have to worry about it.

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READ MORE: Everything you need to know about Windows 10

“Recent comments at Ignite about Windows 10 are reflective of the way Windows will be delivered as a service bringing new innovations and updates in an ongoing manner, with continuous value for our consumer and business customers,” a Microsoft spokesperson said in a statement to tech website The Verge.

Microsoft has made major changes to the upcoming operating system.

One of the biggest features of Windows 10 will be the total unification between desktop and mobile operating systems. The idea is that users will be able to switch between their PCs, tablets and smartphones seamlessly.

The company has also introduced a new web browser, dubbed Microsoft Edge, which promises a very different browsing experience than Internet Explorer.

The OS will also be available for free to any computer or gadget currently running Windows 7 or 8.1, the two previous versions of the software.

As Windows moves to a service model, it’s likely that users will continue to receive updates to Windows as long as their hardware supports them.