March 11, 2016 5:29 pm
Updated: May 30, 2016 11:58 am

Canadians want and do take part in kinky sex: study

Canadians desire and take part in unconventional sex, more than you might think, according to researchers.

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What once was considered kinky sex is now mainstream, according to a new study.

Two Canadian researchers have studied Quebecers’ sexual practices and wishes, and found close to half of those surveyed had partaken or wished to take part in what many consider “abnormal” sex.

Researchers Christian Joyal and Julie Carpentier believe these results are representative of the populations of North America and Europe, and debunks misconceptions.

READ MORE: Bondage, submission common sexual fantasy themes: Montreal study

According to the study, top sexual wishes for Quebecers’:

  • Voyeurism 46 %
  • Fetishism 45 %
  • Exhibitionism 31 %
  • Frotteurism 27 %
  • Masochism 24 %

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Overall, nearly half, 45.6 per cent of those surveyed would like to, or have at least considered abnormal sexual behaviour, according to Joyal, a professor of psychology at the University of Quebec at Trois-Rivières and the Institut Philippe-Pinel de Montréal. He adds that one-third, 33 per cent, have already experienced this kind of sexual behaviour at least once.

He adds sex therapists are contacting him about the research, hoping this will help reduce the stigma that some people feel by desiring these types of sexual behaviours, which can make them feel like sexual deviants.

READ MORE: Sex dungeons, BDSM studios and play spaces: ‘your kinky getaway awaits’

These types of sexual interests and behaviours are considered as paraphilic, or anomalous according to the widely used Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), meaning they are considered abnormal in psychiatry.

The researchers feel definitions need to change, as their study shows this is becoming the norm rather abnormal. They also add a distinction needs to be made between paraphilic sexual behaviour and paraphilic disorders. The difference is “when the sexual act involves non-consenting partners or that induces suffering or distress, ” said Joyal.

Quebecers were surveyed over the phone, and the results were published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.

© 2016 Shaw Media

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