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Manitoba ranks dead last in monthly Canadian workplace happiness survey

Click to play video: 'Workplace Happiness Index puts Manitoba, Sask below other provinces'
Workplace Happiness Index puts Manitoba, Sask below other provinces
Workplace Happiness Index puts Manitoba, Sask below other provinces – Aug 30, 2023

A new report by an HR firm shows Manitoba sitting in last place for worker happiness this summer.

In its latest Happiness Index, ADP Canada found every region it surveys, aside from Manitoba and our neighbours to the west in Saskatchewan, expressed slightly more workplace happiness in August compared to last month.

Manitobans’ scores dipped, with people rating their work happiness a 6.6 out of 10, compared to the national average of 6.8.

The province also ranked dead last when it comes to compensation, benefits and opportunities for career advancement.

“When you look at things like recognition and support, it’s at a 6.2 — again the lowest in the country,” ADP’s Heather Haslam told Global Winnipeg.

Haslam called the result a “tremendous opportunity” for employers in the region to pay attention to workers’ satisfaction, or lack thereof, on the job.
Click to play video: 'Manitoba ranks dead last in monthly Canadian workplace happiness survey'
Manitoba ranks dead last in monthly Canadian workplace happiness survey

“It’s critical for Canadian employers — whether or not you’re a small business owner or you’re a people leader, or someone in HR, … you’re paying attention to these differences,” she said.

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“We know that happiness drives to engagement and engagement drives to the bottom line from a business perspective, but (it) also is critical because we’re the same human beings inside our workplaces as well as out.”

The study also measured happiness by generational demographics, and Haslam said the older cohort — boomers on the verge of retirement — ranked their happiness highest across the board.

“It’s not terribly surprising that those who are toward the end of their careers are more satisfied,” Haslam said.

“They’re more satisfied with their career opportunities. They’re probably less focused on that … and the highest score for them is the work-life balance.”

Millennials and Gen X respondents, on the other hand, were the least satisfied demographics, with Gen Xers across the country offering up only a 6.6 out of 10 rating.

The monthly study, conducted for ADP by Maru Public Opinion, takes place in the first week of each month, and asks more than 1,200 randomly selected working Canadians to rate their happiness.

ADP said the results are weighted by education, age, gender and region in order to be representative of Canada’s population, according to census data. The probability sample has an estimated margin of error of +/-2.8 per cent, 19 times out of 20.

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