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Flood risk varies in southern Manitoba heading into long weekend

The flooding in the RM of Ritchot, Man. is expected to leave behind major damage to municipal infrastructure. Jordan Pearn / Global News

As the Victoria Day long weekend arrives in Manitoba, flood conditions have people moving in different directions.

While some cottages and campers are making alternate plans due to water-ravaged territory, a number of southern Manitoban residents displaced by floodwaters are starting to head back home.

Read more: Flood damage in the RM of Ritchot expected to be more than $1 million

In the Rural Municipality of Ritchot, just south of Winnipeg, around a dozen families will be moving back into their homes.

“The homes were fine,” said Mayor Chris Ewen. “It’s the infrastructure and the day-to-day activities of driving around the ring dike.

“There’s one home that went underwater because they didn’t have their structural dike system in place, but all the other homes we had no issues with. They were above the levels that were regulated and mandated by the province.”

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Read more: Worst flood in Peguis First Nation history has leaders seeking federal aid

In the Whiteshell region, however, floodwater is climbing to levels unseen in at least two decades, just as the official cottage season is supposed to kick off.

Click to play video: 'Camping plans flooded out for some this May Long' Camping plans flooded out for some this May Long
Camping plans flooded out for some this May Long – May 20, 2022

Albert Bos’s family owns Riverview Lodge on Eleanor Lake, about an hour east of Winnipeg.

He said what’s typically an exciting time of year has been much less so this year.

Read more: Flooding in Manitoba’s Whiteshell cutting off access for cottagers, residents

“Yesterday I’d say the water was at least four feet back from the dikes, they were totally dry and then just from overnight, we’re right up to the whole dike,” Bos said. “It’s moved ten feet closer to the lodge and you see it coming up every hour.”

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Bos hopes water levels don’t climb any higher, despite the hours spent sandbagging the area.

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