Advertisement

Spring runoff potential varies across Saskatchewan from well below normal to above normal

The Saskatchewan Water Security Agency says spring runoff estimates are based on a number of factors, including conditions at freeze-up and the snowpack.

Most of southern Saskatchewan has the potential for a below to well below normal spring runoff, according to preliminary data released Friday by the Water Security Agency.

The north, however, could experience a normal to above normal runoff.

The WSA said it bases its estimates on a number of factors, including conditions at freeze-up and the snowpack.

Most of the southern regions experienced very dry conditions last summer and into the fall, and the snowpack is near normal to below normal.

The WSA says this projects to a below normal runoff for an area covering Prince Albert, Saskatoon and Melfort, dipping as far south as Maple Creek and Val Marie.

Story continues below advertisement

A well below normal runoff is currently forecast for the Moose Jaw, Regina, Weyburn and Estevan regions.

Breaking news from Canada and around the world sent to your email, as it happens.
For news impacting Canada and around the world, sign up for breaking news alerts delivered directly to you when they happen.

Get breaking National news

For news impacting Canada and around the world, sign up for breaking news alerts delivered directly to you when they happen.
By providing your email address, you have read and agree to Global News' Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy.

It is the reverse in the far north, where an above-normal runoff is estimated by the WSA.

Extreme wet conditions were reported in the Uranium City, Stony Rapids and Cluff Lake regions before freeze-up, an area that also experienced historically high lake and river levels last summer.

Other regions of the province are forecast to have a near normal runoff.

While fall conditions were slightly drier than normal, the WSA said this has been made up by a near to above near snowfall season to date.

The WSA cautioned, however, that its runoff outlook could change with potentially eight to 10 weeks of winter remaining.

The agency said its first spring runoff forecast will be released in early March.

Click to play video: 'Worst flooding in 45 years hits northwest Saskatchewan: “Our road is underwater”'
Worst flooding in 45 years hits northwest Saskatchewan: “Our road is underwater”

Sponsored content

AdChoices