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Kingston, Belleville, Brockville remember

Remembrance Day Ceremonies took place across our region as people gathered to commemorate those who made the ultimate sacrifice.

Hundreds gathered at the Cross of Sacrifice in Kingston to remember and pay tribute to those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our country.

Among the spectators was Canadian Veteran Rick Hatton, who served in the Canadian Armed Forces for 37 years.

“Having served in the Canadian forces and having a number of soldiers work for me who have passed away and having family members who participated in wartime service, some of whom who have also passed away, that’s what I especially remember,” Hatton told Global News.

Moment of silence for Remembrance Day observed at Toronto intersection
Moment of silence for Remembrance Day observed at Toronto intersection

An overhead salute flew over the Kingston ceremony as military and veteran groups along with local politicians laid wreaths at the bottom of the cross, taking time to reflect on the men and women who have served and continue to serve in the military.

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The weather didn’t stop the crowds — spectators young and old braved the cold to watch the ceremony.

“Taking a moment out of our day to remember… is important, but it shouldn’t be something we only do once a year — it should be something we do every time. So it’s nice to be able to come out and show your support when we can,” said Kingston spectator Dario Paola.

READ MORE: Roughly 32,000 Canadians mark ‘bittersweet’ Remembrance Day in chilly national capital

In Belleville, spectators stood shoulder-to-shoulder at Memorial Park along Veterans Way for their civic ceremony.

“We have the luckiest birthright in the world and the fact that it was paid for with the blood of people who fought before us — we remember that and we’ll always remember that,” said Belleville Mayor Mitch Panciuk.

At the Remembrance Day ceremony in the heart of downtown Brockville, an update to the First and Second World War cenotaph was on full display.

A plaque honouring those who have served from 1953 to present times.

More than 11,000 young people took part in ‘No Stone Left Alone’ ceremonies across Canada
More than 11,000 young people took part in ‘No Stone Left Alone’ ceremonies across Canada

“We wanted to encompass everyone, especially the families of those veterans because believe it or not, it’s the families who actually serve time too,” said corporeal (Retd) Donald Bain.

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As ceremonies across the region wrapped up, those who came to remember left their poppies behind — a symbol of thanks and gratitude to those who never made it home.