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Canadian veterans to benefit from chronic pain research facility at McMaster

Veterans Affairs Minister Lawrence MacAulay has honoured 29 Ontarians for their efforts to improve well-being, care and remembrance of veterans.
Veterans Affairs Minister Lawrence MacAulay has honoured 29 Ontarians for their efforts to improve well-being, care and remembrance of veterans. Ken Mann / Global News

Hamilton will soon be home to a new centre for excellence focused on research and knowledge about chronic pain among Canadian veterans.

The centre is the latest result of a $20-million investment over five years by the federal government.

READ MORE: Trudeau Liberals fail to meet own target for improving veterans care

Minister of Veterans Affairs Lawrence MacAulay visited the centre at McMaster University’s Michael G. DeGroote Centre for Learning and Discovery on Monday morning.

MacAulay notes that veterans suffer chronic pain at twice the rate of other citizens.

READ MORE: Almost 40,000 Canadian veterans waiting to receive disability benefits as of November

MacAulay predicts the centre will help them to get better by “identifying new and emerging treatments” and by “testing innovative therapies that can be shared with health professionals across the country.”

He also says McMaster is a logical location for a Centre for Excellence on Chronic Pain since it is already home to the Michael G. DeGroote National Pain Centre and Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Pain Research and Care.

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WATCH: (May 14, 2019) ‘Bubbles’ starts crowdfunding campaign for fan with severe chronic pain

‘Bubbles’ starts crowdfunding campaign for fan with severe chronic pain
‘Bubbles’ starts crowdfunding campaign for fan with severe chronic pain

MacAulay was also at Hamilton’s Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum on Monday, awarding Minister of Veterans Affairs Commendations to 29 people from across Ontario.

Each has been recognized for going above and beyond in improving well-being, care and remembrance of veterans.

MacAulay says “there’s no end to what they do,” from taking them to the doctor and keeping the legion doors open to raising money for monuments and services.

READ MORE: Hamilton researchers to study impact of cannabis on pain management

Rev. Francis Chisholm of Hamilton, a Second World War veteran and 93-year-old padre of the Royal Canadian Legion, was honoured, in part, for organizing and promoting local ceremonies.

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Chisholm says it’s about reaching out and helping others “make the world a better place, if you can.”