Advertisement

Final design selected for pedestrian bridge from Guelph’s Ward to downtown

The final design for the bridge was picked out of three options with over 60 per cent of the votes from Guelph residents.
The final design for the bridge was picked out of three options with over 60 per cent of the votes from Guelph residents. City of Guelph

A pedestrian bridge connecting downtown Guelph to the Ward neighbourhood is one step closer to becoming a reality after the city announced on Tuesday that a final design has been selected.

The bridge will cross over the Speed River next to the Guelph Junction Railway Bridge and connect to paths leading to Arthur Street in the east and the intersection at Macdonell and Wellington streets to the west.

READ MORE: Guelph Storm mourn the death of longtime volunteer Rita Campbell

The path is expected to eventually lead past Arthur Street to Huron Street as part of a future active transportation trail, the city said.

Three designs were presented to residents during an open house in April and through an online survey. The first option was selected with over 60 per cent of the vote, according to a statement.

Story continues below advertisement

The city said option one had four online votes, 16 written votes and three emailed votes. In total, 37 people voted.

The design features a bench, an open mesh railing on the south side, a widened middle deck for better viewing and foot traffic, and a lookout area.

“We’re very excited to see this project come to life,” said Luke Jefferson, manager of open space planning with the city. “Our community has waited a long time for a safe and vibrant bridge that connects one of the city’s oldest neighbhourhoods with the downtown.”

READ MORE: Guelph-area public health agency conducting cannabis survey

The city said officials will be working with the consultant to further develop the design of the bridge and the trails, and another public open house will be scheduled later this summer to gather feedback on the entire site.

The plan will then be placed in the 10-year budget forecast for council consideration.

According to the display boards presented at the open house, the project is slated to be completed in 2020.

Sponsored content