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Non-partisan group hosting high speed rail info meetings in Tavistock, New Hamburg, Thorndale

In this Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016 photo, an Amtrak Acela train travels through Old Lyme, Conn. A plan to speed up Amtrak's high-speed rail corridor from Boston to Washington, D.C., is welcomed by business commuters but finding its strongest opposition in some shoreline towns in Connecticut. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer).
In this Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016 photo, an Amtrak Acela train travels through Old Lyme, Conn. A plan to speed up Amtrak's high-speed rail corridor from Boston to Washington, D.C., is welcomed by business commuters but finding its strongest opposition in some shoreline towns in Connecticut. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer).

Rural communities surrounding London will have a chance to talk about the province’s proposed high-speed rail line Tuesday night.

InterCityRail, a non-partisan ad-hoc group that promotes only part of the infrastructure project, is hosting an information meeting in Tavistock at 7 p.m., at the Tavistock Memorial Hall.

“What we want to do is educate the people about the province’s announcement about high speed rail,” said one of the group’s coordinators, Ken Westcar.

Westcar said the information meeting will start with a roughly 30-minute presentation by the group’s steering committee, followed up by a question and answer period.

READ MORE: Wynne announces $11B for London-Toronto high speed rail line

“There are a lot of technical and commercial, social and economic issues that have not been divulged,” Westcar explained.

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Although their prime goal is to educate people, Westcar said they’ll also shed light on some of their own concerns, specifically with the line between Kitchener to London.

“The problem with this is it’s going to be a brand new route, so [the province] will need to expropriate about a thousand acres of agricultural land.”

On top of that, Westcar said the high-speed rail line will sever farm properties and about 50 roads that will either turn into dead-ends, or need overpasses.

READ MORE: Kathleen Wynne rolls out high speed rail plan

“We feel that there are other options, including the improvement of services currently offered by VIA rail both on the north mainline through Stratford, and the south one through Brantford and Woodstock to London.”

InterCityRail is hosting another meeting at 7 p.m. Wednesday at the New Hamburg Arena in New Hamburg, and a third meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Purple Hill Hall in Thorndale.

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During a stop in London earlier this month, Premier Kathleen Wynne committed $11 billion in provincial funds to the project.

She says it’ll connect between London and Toronto in just 73 minutes.

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