Advertisement

‘I’m truly sorry’: sentencing hearing concludes for teen who brutally killed six-week-old baby

Click to play video: 'Teen apologizes at sentencing hearing for killing baby boy: ‘I’m just truly sorry’' Teen apologizes at sentencing hearing for killing baby boy: ‘I’m just truly sorry’
WATCH ABOVE: A teen apologized at the end of her sentencing hearing in Saskatoon for killing a six-week-old baby boy in July 2016. Warning: This video contains disturbing content – Dec 15, 2017

Her victim was a vulnerable, defenceless baby who was less than two months old. Now, the fate of a young offender is in the hands of the judge who will effectively determine where the accused will serve her time and for how long.

The sentencing hearing for the now 18-year-old came to a close on Friday but not before she stood and addressed the family of Nikosis Cantre, weeping through the window of the prisoners’ box before sitting down.

READ MORE: Justice official says teen who killed Sask. baby will need life-long treatment

“I’m truly sorry for what I’ve done. I just hope that I never go through this again,” said the teen.

Instead of preparing for his second Christmas, Nikosis’s family has had to hear extremely graphic and gruesome details in court about how the six-week-old was choked and beaten to death in July 2016 by the teen, an adolescent they had taken in off the streets of Saskatoon — not knowing that she had escaped from the Kilburn Hall Youth Detention Centre the day before.

Story continues below advertisement

“I cry every day when I wake up. I cry every day when I go to bed,” said Jeffery Longman, Nikosis’ grandfather.

Jeffery Longman, Nikosis Cantre’s grandfather.

The court heard the teen has exhibited a pattern of violence, attacking other youth and staff in centres where she was held in custody as well as mutilating and skinning animals alive.

Perhaps the eeriest testimony reviewed by the Crown was what the teen had told authorities after the murder.

She feared having children of her own saying, “I won’t do it again, but I’m afraid it may happen again.”

“The fact that it was a baby just makes the crime seem more heinous because of the vulnerability of an infant. I would be concerned even if it had been an unprovoked act — which it was — on somebody that wasn’t an infant,” said Jennifer Claxton-Viczko, Crown prosecutor.

Story continues below advertisement

The judge will now have to determine if the 18-year-old should be sentenced as a youth or adult for the crime.

Brice Perkins / Global News

The defence argued that the young woman had already been handed a life sentence at birth with no parental guidance growing up.

“With this young lady’s severe cognitive disabilities, her FASD [fetal alcohol spectrum disorder] diagnosis and various other factors, she has a lower degree of moral blameworthiness than the average offender, the average youth even,” said criminal defence attorney Brian Pfefferle.
Story continues below advertisement

“This is a young woman who at the time of the offence was 16, but for all intents and purposes was much younger in every single way.”

The Crown disagreed, arguing that those deficiencies or impairments should not be a consideration, and that the youth is old enough to be sentenced as an adult based on age-related maturity.

WATCH: Emotions high in court for family of baby boy killed in Saskatoon by teen
Click to play video: 'Emotions high in court for family of baby boy killed in Saskatoon by teen' Emotions high in court for family of baby boy killed in Saskatoon by teen
Emotions high in court for family of baby boy killed in Saskatoon by teen – Dec 14, 2017

“The sentence as an adult would allow for a much longer sentence. It would be a life sentence where she could be under care and supervision given not only the programming that she needs and attempts at rehabilitation but also supervision to ensure that the public remains safe,” the Crown argued.

A decision on this matter will handed down Feb. 27, 2018. Defence counsel has signalled that if the teen is sentenced as an adult, he will not argue for her identity to be withheld from the public.

Advertisement

Sponsored content