Advertisement

Little girl remains in coma after Manning Dr. crash; mom wants to ‘trade places with her child’

9-year-old girl still in a coma after serious collision on Manning Drive in north Edmonton
WATCH ABOVE: Adassa Craig, 9, remains in an Edmonton hospital with critical injuries after a crash on Manning Drive last week. Kendra Slugoski talked to a family friend and had this update on Global News at Noon.

A nine-year-old girl critically injured in a Nov. 1 crash on Manning Drive continues her long road to recovery surrounded by her family.

Loved ones told Global News on Tuesday that Adassa Craig remains in a coma and her mother, Mary Noah, is staying by her daughter’s side around the clock.

“Her injuries are very severe,” said Patricia Caldwell, a close friend of the family.

“The surgeons are really focused on her brain, that’s the priority right now just because that’s where most of the damage has been from the accident.”

Tweet This

The pair was in a Honda Civic heading north on Manning Drive when it collided with a southbound transport bus. Both mom and daughter were taken to hospital: Mary suffered non-life-threatening injuries, but her daughter was left in critical condition.

Story continues below advertisement

READ MORE: Child in critical condition after car, bus collide in northeast Edmonton

Caldwell said the little girl sustained a “full body injury.”

“Adassa’s brain pressure has lowered from 35 — which is pretty high, following the accident, after the operation — to 19 today, which has been steady for two days, so that’s really good news.

“Mary remains by Adassa’s side, reading… talking to her, making sure that she knows that mom loves her,” Caldwell said. “Dad is by her side as well, grandparents, aunties, uncles. They’re just really taking turns because they don’t want to overstimulate Adassa.”

While it’s clearly going to be a long road ahead for the nine-year-old, the crash is taking a toll on her whole family.

“It’s your worst nightmare really — for someone so young to be going through this and fighting to live,” Caldwell said.

Tweet This

“Mary is in emotional distress, emotional turmoil because she wants to be able to trade places with her child… It’s unfortunate because she cannot, she cannot be the one in Adassa’s situation at present, but she remains strong.”

Adassa, 9, sustained serious injuries in a crash on Manning Drive on Nov. 1, 2017.
Adassa, 9, sustained serious injuries in a crash on Manning Drive on Nov. 1, 2017. Courtesy: GoFundMe/Adassa's Campaign
Courtesy: GoFundMe/Adassa's Campaign
Adassa, 9, sustained serious injuries in a crash on Manning Drive on Nov. 1, 2017.
Adassa, 9, sustained serious injuries in a crash on Manning Drive on Nov. 1, 2017. Courtesy: GoFundMe/Adassa's Campaign

Caldwell said Mary is relying on her faith, the support of family, friends and co-workers, as well as messages of support from complete strangers.

Story continues below advertisement
“She just wants to say thank you from the bottom of her heart [and] to keep it coming. She does read the Facebook pages, Twitter and all of that to Adassa so she knows that she has friends in school that love her and care for her and are praying for her.

“We’re just overwhelmed by the amount of support that we’ve received,” Caldwell added. “Very appreciative and overwhelmed.”

Tweet This

The family is also expressing thanks to the first responders and to staff at the Stollery Children’s Hospital for their care.

Mary is an elementary school teacher in Fort Saskatchewan and used to teach in St. Albert. She’s heard from her colleagues, as well as friends and family in Quebec, Edmonton and beyond.

Caldwell has started a GoFundMe page to support the family during the long recovery process.

READ MORE: 9-year-old girl with ‘infectious smile’ still critical after Manning Dr. crash 

As Adassa’s birthday next month approaches, Mary has a few simple wishes for her daughter.

“For Adassa to wake up, just to hear her brilliant laughter… to play with her baby brother again… and just to be able to talk and open her eyes and understand,” Caldwell said. “To remain wilful to be able to live, would be a miracle.”