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California wildfires: Striking aerial photos show devastation caused by infernos

Behind the science of California’s deadly wildfires
WATCH ABOVE: The death toll is mounting to record levels across northern California as wildfires continue to rage. As Eric Sorensen reports, they are the latest instance of a growing phenomenon around the world: giant blazes feeding off extreme conditions fueled by climate change.

Aerial photos emerging from the California wildfires show homes completely levelled by the infernos and green spaces charred.

READ MORE: Wine country fires could mean fewer California wines for years

About 800 firefighters struggled to contain the blazes on Friday, which have killed an unprecedented 31 people and destroyed at least 35,000 homes and businesses. An estimated 25,000 people have been forced to flee, with new evacuations still being issued.

WATCH: More coverage of the California wildfires

Wildfires which began Sunday have left hundreds more missing or injured, authorities said on Friday.

They explained that the real recovery efforts will begin once firefighters are able to contain the 21 wildfires, which are covering more than 300 square kilometres. Most are less than 10 per cent contained.

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READ MORE: Fire officials warn even a discarded cigarette will ignite a blaze

Here are some aerial shots that show the extent of the damage in the city of Santa Rosa, which is among the worst hit by the fires.

In this aerial view, a burned neighbourhood is seen in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Oct. 12, 2017.
In this aerial view, a burned neighbourhood is seen in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Oct. 12, 2017. Josh Edelson/Getty Images
An aerial view of homes that were destroyed by the Tubbs Fire on Oct. 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, Calif.
An aerial view of homes that were destroyed by the Tubbs Fire on Oct. 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Here are photos of the neighbourhood surrounding Coffey Park in Santa Rosa, taken on Wednesday:

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READ MORE: What are the ‘Diablo winds’ fanning the flames in wine country?

Fire damage is seen from the air in the Coffey Park neighbourhood on Oct. 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, Calif.
Fire damage is seen from the air in the Coffey Park neighbourhood on Oct. 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, Calif. Elijah Nouvelage/AFP/Getty Images
Fire damage is seen from the air in the Coffey Park neighbourhood on Oct. 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, Calif.
Fire damage is seen from the air in the Coffey Park neighbourhood on Oct. 11, 2017, in Santa Rosa, Calif. Elijah Nouvelage/AFP/Getty Images

Here’s what the neighbourhood looked like before the fire.

The neighbourhood surrounding Coffey Park in Santa Rosa, Calif.
The neighbourhood surrounding Coffey Park in Santa Rosa, Calif. Google Maps

The city’s Journey’s End mobile home park was completely levelled by the fire.

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Homes destroyed by fires are seen from an aerial view at Journey’s End mobile home park in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017.
Homes destroyed by fires are seen from an aerial view at Journey’s End mobile home park in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017. Jeff Chiu/AP

This is what it looked like just days ago:

A view of what the Journey’s End mobile home park looked like before the wildfires.
A view of what the Journey’s End mobile home park looked like before the wildfires. Google Maps

According to ABC News, dozens of rescue personnel are currently searching the mobile home park for bodies and injured people.

Sonoma County Sheriff’s Sgt. Dave Thompson said they discovered one body Friday, and there is a “high probability” there will be more.

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— With files from the Associated Press, Reuters