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U.S. ambassador to Canada confirms he will resign inauguration day

U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman speaks at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, Monday June 2, 2014.
U.S. Ambassador to Canada Bruce Heyman speaks at the National Gallery of Canada in Ottawa, Monday June 2, 2014. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand

The American ambassador to Canada, Bruce Heyman, has confirmed his last day of work will be Jan. 20, 2017, the day Donald Trump becomes president.

Heyman tweeted early Friday that he will respect a blanket mandate issued by Trump’s camp that requires politically appointed ambassadors installed by President Barack Obama to leave their posts by Inauguration Day.

Heyman’s ambassadorship was confirmed by the U.S. Senate on March 12, 2014. He officially began his duties in Ottawa on April 8 that same spring.

READ MORE: Obama’s appointed ambassadors told to quit by Trump’s Inauguration Day

A report in the New York Times earlier this week quoted diplomatic sources as saying previous U.S. administrations, from both major political parties, have traditionally granted extensions to allow a few ambassadors, particularly those with school-age children, to remain in place for weeks or months.

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That will not occur under Trump.

Bruce Heyman and wife Vicki dance with their grandaughters during the 4th of July celebrations in Ottawa on Monday, July 4, 2016.
Bruce Heyman and wife Vicki dance with their grandaughters during the 4th of July celebrations in Ottawa on Monday, July 4, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Canada could be left without a Senate-confirmed envoy for months between the day Heyman leaves and the date when a new ambassador can be selected and approved. That is not unusual, however, as the post has been left vacant for similar stretches between past administrations.

With files from Reuters.