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Toronto police launch week-long ‘Step Up and Be Safe’ road safety campaign

Click to play video '1 pedestrian dead, 1 in life-threatening condition after being struck by vehicles in Toronto' 1 pedestrian dead, 1 in life-threatening condition after being struck by vehicles in Toronto
WATCH ABOVE: One woman is dead and another woman has been rushed to hospital in life-threatening condition after they were struck by vehicles in Toronto Sunday – Nov 6, 2016

Toronto police will pay special attention to drivers, pedestrians and cyclists during the week-long “Step Up and Be Safe” road safety campaign.

The annual safety blitz takes place between Nov. 7 to Sunday, Nov. 13 with officers focusing on seniors this year.

READ MORE: 1 pedestrian dead, 1 in life-threatening condition after being struck by vehicles in Toronto

Police say pedestrian fatalities represent approximately 60 per cent of yearly traffic fatalities in Toronto.

Authorities say seniors are among the most vulnerable sector of road users with 23 senior pedestrian fatalities among a total of 37 deaths so far in 2016.

“When we look at traffic fatalities, we look at the causal factors. Quite often it’s the vehicle making a left turn at an intersection, right hand turn at an intersection, or a mid-block crossing by a pedestrian that are leading to fatal collisions,” Const. Clint Stibbe said. “So far, every one of the fatalities we’ve seen so far this year, have fit into one of those three categories.”

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READ MORE: Why do Toronto pedestrian accidents peak at the end of November?

Police say the number of pedestrian-related traffic injuries normally goes up in the month of November.

Officers will keep a close eye on pedestrian crossovers, crosswalks, intersections, school zones and crossing areas frequented by seniors.

“The idea is that everyone has to use their heads. We’re not trying to blame anybody. It’s not a blame game. It’s a brain game. You have to start thinking about what you’re doing,” Stibbe said.

— Cindy Pom contributed to this report

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