August 11, 2016 10:00 am

Stampeders QB Bo Levi Mitchell accuses Roughriders of bending CFL roster rules

Calgary Stampeders quarterback Bo Levi Mitchell is accusing the Saskatchewan Roughriders of bending the CFL roster rules.

Jeff McIntosh / The Canadian Press
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It’s no secret the Saskatchewan Roughriders have made a lot of roster moves this season.

Head coach and general manager Chris Jones and his staff are after all rebuilding the team after last year’s 3-15 disaster.

READ MORE: Saskatchewan Roughriders sign Canadian quarterback Brandon Bridge

But now Calgary Stampeders quarterback Bo Levi Mitchell said Saskatchewan is bending the rules surrounding how teams manage their rosters.

On Tuesday, after the Riders added six new players, Mitchell tweeted “I bet none of the people they signed needed flights.”

Mitchell seemed to imply that they had already been practicing with the team despite not being on the active roster, practice roster or the six-game injured list.

When asked if he was accusing Saskatchewan of cheating, Mitchell’s response was “I’m not rooting for Russia.”

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While the Riders do have unsigned players regularly work out on their own after scheduled practices, Jones said his team is doing nothing wrong.

“We’re able, by CFL rules, to have tryout people at practice every single day, and we’ve brought a lot of people in because we’re never going to quit searching for talent,” Jones said after practice on Wednesday.

The CFL has said they are looking into the allegations.

READ MORE: CFL fines Saskatchewan Roughriders for roster violation versus B.C. Lions

The Riders were fined earlier this season for violating the ratio rules for Canadian and American born players dressed for a game.

The Roughriders and Stampeders clash this Saturday when they meet at Mosaic Stadium in Regina. Kickoff is at 5 p.m. CT.

Ryan Flaherty contributed to this story

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