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Slippery sidewalks? It’s time to channel your inner penguin

Ice impact
WATCH ABOVE: The recent rain in Edmonton is impacting different people in different ways. Pedestrians may not appreciate the slipperiness, but the people behind a local winter festival say the wet weather isn't all bad. Kendra Slugoski reports.

EDMONTON – The Capital Region was in a bit of a slippery situation Wednesday morning after rain passed through the region Tuesday night.

Anywhere from three to eight mm of rain fell over the course of the evening. Areas to the north of the city saw more precipitation than those on the southside.

The rain combined with mild temperatures made for slick conditions, particularly on area sidewalks. According to Alberta Health Services, between April 2013 and March 2014, there injuries caused by falls on ice accounted for 16,910 visits to Alberta emergency departments.

In order to avoid a potentially painful or embarrassing slip, AHS suggests channelling your inner penguin.

It may not be the most graceful way to walk, but the penguin waddle will keep you on your feet. Here’s how you do it:

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  • Bend slightly and walk flat footed;
  • Point your feet out slightly like a penguin;
  • Keep your centre of gravity over your feet as much as possible;
  • Take shorter, shuffle-like steps;
  • Keep your arms at your sides (not in your pockets!);
  • Concentrate on keeping your balance;
  • Walk slowly.

WATCH: It turns out there’s a lot humans can learn from penguins when it comes to walking in slippery conditions. Emily Mertz explains.

Walk like a penguin
Walk like a penguin

While there may be some concerns about what the mild weather means for the winter festivals and events in the city, those with Ice on Whyte say the water actually helps fill holes in the sculptures.

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And when it comes to the rain, those with Ice Castles say, ‘bring it on!’

READ MORE: Things to do in Edmonton this winter

City of Edmonton road crews took to the streets overnight to sand arterial and collector roads, as well as residential intersections. Community sandboxes were also filled up Tuesday for residential use. The sand is free at participating community leagues. For a list of locations, visit the city’s website.

Slippery sidewalks in Edmonton Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 after rain Tuesday night.
Slippery sidewalks in Edmonton Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016 after rain Tuesday night. Kendra Slugoski, Global News
Those with Ice on Whyte say the rain helps the ice sculptures.
Those with Ice on Whyte say the rain helps the ice sculptures. Kendra Slugoski, Global News
Those with Ice on Whyte say the rain helps the ice sculptures.
Those with Ice on Whyte say the rain helps the ice sculptures. Kendra Slugoski, Global News
City crews work to remove ice from Edmonton sidewalks Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016.
City crews work to remove ice from Edmonton sidewalks Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. Morris Gamblin, Global News
Those with Ice on Whyte say the rain helps the ice sculptures.
Those with Ice on Whyte say the rain helps the ice sculptures. Kendra Slugoski, Global News
Rain on Tuesday made for slippery sidewalks in Edmonton Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016.
Rain on Tuesday made for slippery sidewalks in Edmonton Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. Kendra Slugoski, Global News

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Walk like a penguin
Walk like a penguin

WATCH ABOVE:It turns out there’s a lot humans can learn from penguins when it comes to walking in slippery conditions. Emily Mertz explains.