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Rallies against B.C. old-growth logging held at offices of premier, attorney general

Click to play video: 'Hundreds protest logging rules on Vancouver Island' Hundreds protest logging rules on Vancouver Island
Hundreds of people rallied at B.C. Premier John Horgan's office, Friday, demanding changes to the way the province manage old-growth forests. Their anger is sparked by ongoing controversy surrounding logging in the Fairy Creek watershed on Vancouver Island. – May 28, 2021

Two rallies to protest old-growth logging in British Columbia took place Friday at the offices of B.C. Premier John Horgan and Attorney General David Eby.

A large crowd gathered outside Horgan’s constituency office to protest old-growth logging practices.

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Click to play video: 'Calls intensify for B.C. officials to manage ancient forests' Calls intensify for B.C. officials to manage ancient forests
Calls intensify for B.C. officials to manage ancient forests – May 28, 2021

A smaller crowd gathered outside Eby’s constituency in Vancouver’s Kitsilano neighbourhood.

More than 130 people have been arrested so far at blockades aimed at preventing old-growth logging in the Fairy Creek watershed near Port Renfrew.

Read more: New tactics on display as B.C.’s old-growth logging dispute heats up

Activists say very little old-growth forest remains in B.C. and Fairy Creek is the last unprotected intact valley on southern Vancouver Island.

Read more: The story behind the viral photo of a massive old-growth tree on a B.C. highway

Click to play video: 'Anti-logging protests on Vancouver Island intensify' Anti-logging protests on Vancouver Island intensify
Anti-logging protests on Vancouver Island intensify – May 28, 2021

“B.C. is well known for these massive trees and these very vibrant ecosystems and we’re down to less than 400,000 hectares of them throughout the province,” said Kathleen Code of the Rainforest Flying Squad, a group that has been involved with the protests.

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“Fairy Creek represents a small portion of that, but I think we’re down to the point where every last hectare counts now.”

Teal-Jones has said it plans to harvest about 20 hectares at the north ridge of the 1,200-hectare watershed out of 200 available for harvest.

— with files from Simon Little, Paul Johnson and The Canadian Press

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