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Appeal court overturns acquittal of driver who killed Vancouver doctor, declares him guilty

At left, the scene of the crash that killed Alphonsus Hui in 2015.
At left, the scene of the crash that killed Alphonsus Hui in 2015. Global News/File photo

The B.C. Court of Appeal has overturned the controversial acquittal of a driver involved in a 2015 fatal crash.

Dr. Alphonsus Hui died after he was struck by an Audi travelling 119 kilometres an hour through the intersection at Oak Street and West 41st Avenue.

Crown appealed the acquittal of Ken Chung who had been charged with dangerous driving causing death in relation to the fatal crash.

“I am so excited to be able to go back to everybody who lent a voice who also felt like this was wrong and tell them that they got it right, they got it right today,” said Hui’s daughter Monique through tears outside the court.

WATCH: (Aired June 18) Disturbing dash cam video shows horrific high-speed crash that killed Dr. Alphonsus Hui

Dash cam video shows horrific high speed crash
Dash cam video shows horrific high speed crash

The court replaced the acquittal with a guilty verdict and sent the case back to provincial court for sentencing.

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An appeal court judge ruled that driving at such a high speed is “so wildly beyond any safe standard that it is appropriately branded criminal.”

Chung was originally charged with dangerous driving causing death following the crash.

WATCH: (Aired June 15) Family fights for justice after speeder kills beloved doctor

Family fights for justice after speeder kills beloved doctor
Family fights for justice after speeder kills beloved doctor

Hui, who was headed to work when the collision occurred, died at the scene from multiple blunt force trauma.

In May 2018, a judge ruled Chung’s speeding was a “momentary lapse” and did not meet the test to find criminal fault.

Monique Hui immediately launched a petition calling not only for an appeal but also for changes to B.C.’s dangerous driving laws. The petition gained more than 100,000 signatures.

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