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Participants pedal the way to a cure at Johnson Bike tour

Photo from the Annual Johnson MS Bike Tour from Leduc to Camrose.  Cyclists aren't putting the brakes on finding a cure.
Photo from the Annual Johnson MS Bike Tour from Leduc to Camrose. Cyclists aren't putting the brakes on finding a cure. Credit: Johnson MS Bike Tour

Over 1,700 cyclists crossed the finish line south of Edmonton Sunday, after they geared up to support Canadian research into the cause and cure of multiple sclerosis.

Music and cheering filled the air in Nisku, Alta., after the Camrose-to-Leduc stretch of the Johnson MS Bike tour wrapped up.

READ MORE: Johnson MS Bike – Leduc to Camrose

Andrea Trigg participated last year after being diagnosed with MS. She didn’t hesitate to return for a second year.

“This year, no questions asked, we did it again. We signed up right away,” said Trigg, who rode with a team of about 20 cyclists. “This is our way of giving back to the society, and to everyone else with MS.”

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The bike tour is one of the largest MS fundraisers for the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada. Trigg explained that it’s a great experience to see so many people come out in support for the cause.

“Because it’s my second year, I knew what to expect. And I got to enjoy it a little bit more,” she said.

 “It’s emotional, because you’re riding with other people who have it, and you’re riding with people who just want to raise money for such a good cause.”

After the two-day event wrapped up, donations were just shy of the bike tour’s $2,000,000 goal. In addition to funding research into causes and potential cures for MS, the fundraiser aims to help Canadians with MS live better lives in the meantime.

READ MORE: Common acne drug could treat MS, University of Calgary research shows

“Two of the medications that I’ve been on, obviously come from research. And they come from people’s time, and energy, and hard earned money – to develop something that ideally will prevent this disease from getting worse,” Trigg explained. “I know for people who have progressive MS it’s so important because the disease hurts them quite harshly.”

 “The community support is incredible. I’m out there riding with people, some of who know nobody personally close to them with MS, others who know far too many. And it’s just everyone’s there in unity and support, we’re all fighting it together.”

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You can still donate to this year’s Johnson MS Bike Tour at their website.